1442 Closed Mosques Require MAD 2 Billion to Reopen

By Kawtar EnnajiRabat – Minister of Religious Endowments and Islamic Affairs,  Ahmed Toufiq, said the ministry plans to freeze its investments in mosques, new administrative institutions, and Quranic schools in order to address the problem of closed mosques.During a question session at the House of Representatives held Monday, June 17, Toufiq discussed the ministry’s efforts to recondition mosques closed since 2011. He went on to indicate that “the closure of mosques is implemented based on a review by a specialized committee after the confirmation of a real threat.” Toufiq revealed that, since 2011, experts conducted 4,661 technical expertise operations at a total cost of MAD 140 million, resulting in the closure of 3,007 mosques.Read Also: King Mohammed VI Authorizes Opening of 20 MosquesHe added that the ministry has supervised the renovation of 910 mosques at a cost of MAD 473 million, the reconditioned mosques have since been reopened to worshipers. There are currently 466 mosques in the renovation phase at a total cost of MAD 962 million, while 189 mosques are under licensing at a total cost of MAD 243 million.Toufiq mentioned that 1442 mosques are still closed and that their renovation over the next 3 years would require a total cost of MAD 2 billion.He added that the ministry will work on mobilizing MAD 1 billion from the investment budget allocated to it, and requested the allocation of an additional negotiable amount of MAD 1 billion.Toufiq pointed out that despite the Ministry’s efforts, the monitoring process carried out by Walis and governors resulted in the closure of an average of 157 mosques annually.“Most benefactors prefer to build new mosques instead of rebuilding collapsing ones,” Toufiq said. He also appealed to the benefactors to sensitize them to the need to renovate the collapsing mosques, saying that reconditioning is as rewarding as building. read more

Affordable drugs for poor countries are feasible WHOWTO experts say

The 80 experts from 21 countries attending the workshop shared the view that if certain conditions are met, the practice of “differential pricing” — charging varying prices in different markets according to purchasing power — is feasible, provided certain conditions are met.”Although participants clearly approached the issues from different points of view, there was broad recognition that differential pricing could play an important role in ensuring access to existing drugs at affordable prices, particularly in the poorest countries,” said Adrian Otten, Director of WTO’s Intellectual Property Division.WHO Director-General Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland said concerns about intellectual property must be balanced with attention to the broader context. “Intellectual property rights stimulate development of new medicines, but must be implemented in an impartial way that safeguards public health,” said Dr. Brundtland. “We also need to ensure that there are additional incentives for the development of the drugs needed to address the health problems of people in poor countries.”When drug prices fall there is still no guarantee that poor communities can afford them. In the case of HIV/AIDS, even with costs coming down to $500 per patient per year, the sums required would be well beyond the reach of many countries, according to WHO.Under those circumstances, significant amounts of external financing would be needed to help poor countries provide treatment. Many workshop participants stressed that financing for drugs should not be considered in isolation, and called for massive funding increases to develop effective healthcare systems in general.Organized in cooperation with the Norwegian Foreign Ministry and the United States-based Global Health Council, the three-day workshop attracted government representatives from both developed and developing countries, as well as participants from international research firms, generic pharmaceutical companies from Asia, Africa and Latin America, non-governmental organizations, consumer groups, universities and international organizations. read more

Excessive steaming a factor in CNRLs Primrose leaks Alberta regulator

Excessive steaming a factor in CNRL’s Primrose leaks: Alberta regulator by Lauren Krugel, The Canadian Press Posted Mar 21, 2016 2:00 am MDT Last Updated Mar 22, 2016 at 6:40 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email CALGARY – Excessive steaming was one of the factors that caused more than one million litres of oily water to ooze to the surface at an eastern Alberta oilsands site nearly three years ago, an investigation by the Alberta Energy Regulator has concluded.The AER’s report released Monday also said the bitumen-water emulsion was able to travel from deep underground through old unused wellbores, natural fractures and faults as well as man-made cracks in the rock.“This is one of the most complex investigations we’ve ever undertaken,” said Kirk Bailey, executive vice-president of operations at the provincial energy watchdog.A separate investigation into a 2009 leak at the same site came to a similar conclusion.Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (TSX:CNQ) had been using an extraction method at its Primrose oilsands property called high-pressure cyclic steam stimulation, the safety of which has been questioned by environmental groups.The technique involves injecting steam deep into a reservoir through a well, letting it soak so that the thick bitumen is liquefied, and drawing the oil up to the surface through the same well.Pressure restrictions imposed at Primrose following the leaks discovered in May and June of 2013 have been made permanent to avoid a similar event from happening in the future.“The company will not be able to pursue its original operating strategy at Primrose,” said Bailey.Cyclic steaming is widely used in the oilsands. Bailey said the AER took a broader look at other operations and concluded that they are safe.The AER said CNRL didn’t break any rules with its steaming technique.Both the company and the regulator say the amount of bitumen that can ultimately be recovered at Primrose is unchanged. But the AER said it may just take longer to do so.The AER’s final report on Primrose follows probes by the company and by an independent technical panel.The AER disagreed with CNRL’s view that the wellbores were the main culprit.As a result, the restrictions the AER is imposing are “more conservative” than they would have been if the wellbores were the main factor.CNRL spokeswoman Julie Woo said knowledge the company gleaned as a result of its investigations should help lower the risk of a future seepages.“Our enhanced operational practices and strategies — in place since July 2013 — includes modified steaming strategies, enhanced pressure monitoring and response strategies as well as remediation of wellbores to mitigate the risk of future seepages.”Chris Severson-Baker, with Pembina Institute environmental think-tank, said while other operators have a much better track record with high-pressure cyclic steam stimulation, “I think these incidents call into question whether this is a viable method for extracting bitumen in the future.”Follow @LaurenKrugel on Twitter. read more

DMT cooperation with Kazgeology to evaluate Kazakh mineral deposits

first_imgAt this year’s MINEX Central Asia fair, held in Kazakhstan in April, German mining consulting company DMT sealed a cooperation agreement with Kazakhstan’s national geological exploration company Kazgeology. The aim of the collaboration is to develop the evaluation of mineral deposits in Kazakhstan to recognised international standards.“Kazakhstan plans to evaluate its deposits in accordance with the international CRIRSCO standards in the future, in order to attract international investors to the country,” explains DMT Managing Director Prof. Eiko Räkers. “As an international consulting firm with many years of experience in this area, DMT is proud to have been selected to support Kazakhstan in this important task.”The construction of a geochemical laboratory, in which rock, stream sediment, soil and drill core samples can be analysed, is currently being planned. In addition, a data processing centre is to be set up, where geochemical, geological and geophysical data will be used to generate geological 3D models. DMT and its partners will also be responsible for educating and training the employees of Kazgeology.last_img read more

Photograph shows the awesome power contained in one orange

first_imgSurely a small part of your youth was spent experimenting with the classic lemon battery, right? It’s a classic mainly because it’s a great tool for teaching about the science behind electricity. Although, lemons are a little lumpy and unattractive, and they don’t photograph very well. Photographer Caleb Charland made a slight tweak to the experimental setup, and used an orange to get this awesome picture.The nails inserted into the slices of orange are coated in zinc, which acts as the electrode along with a bit of copper wire wrapped around them. The citric acid of the orange serves as a reasonably effective electrolyte. As the zinc electrode sheds zinc ions into the electrolyte (the orange), electrons are transmitted to the copper electrode. Along the way, they can be used to power a light source, as in this image.Lemons are often used because they tend to have more citric acid and thus a lower pH. That means the light you attach glows more brightly. It turns out that oranges wouldn’t make the best classroom experiments — this image is a 14 hour exposure. Anything shorter and you wouldn’t have been able to see the eerie glow emanating from the concealed LED light source.It’s actually very clever how Charland wired up the individual slices in series to act like a multi-cell battery. It might not be the kind of thing you can set up on your nightstand, but still a really stunning photo of science in action.via Caleb Charlandlast_img read more

Le téléphone portable un danger pour la santé

first_imgLe téléphone portable, un danger pour la santé ? Depuis le début de semaine, un grand débat s’est ouvert à Lyon au sujet des conséquences de l’utilisation du portable sur la santé. Une fois les constats faits par une trentaine d’experts internationaux, les résultats seront rendus publics le 31 mai prochain. Organisée à l’initiative du Centre International de Recherche sur le Cancer (Circ), agence spécialisée de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), une réunion s’est ouverte à Lyon pour définir les risques réels encourus par l’homme lorsqu’il est soumis à des radiofréquences, notamment celles de la téléphonie mobile.À lire aussi6 milliards d’abonnements téléphoniques sur TerreSuite à cette réunion à laquelle une trentaine d’experts participent, des conclusions seront rendues publiques le 31 mai prochain afin de mettre en lumière l’impact des radiations sur l’homme. Des résultats qui devraient intéresser la plupart d’entre nous puisque nous sommes tous concernés. En effet, de nombreux appareils de la vie quotidienne diffusent des radiations : du micro-ondes aux radars, à la radio, la télévision ou les téléphones portables, nous sommes envahis d’ondes polluantes. Le téléphone portable : le plus néfaste pour l’homme en terme de radiations ? Si une étude a été menée en 2000 dans 13 pays différents sur la nocivité des téléphones portables, elle est aujourd’hui obsolète. C’est pourquoi, le débat a été remis en marche par le Centre international de Recherches sur le Cancer (Circ), qui a souhaité réunir des experts pendant une semaine pour revenir sur cette question. Pour l’heure, l’initiative menée par la Circ a été saluée par les associations Priartem et Agir pour l’Environnement qui se réjouissent de la transparence de cette réunion. Le 27 mai 2011 à 09:17 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Une huître vieille de 145 Ma recèleraitelle une perle géante

first_imgUne huître vieille de 145 Ma recèlerait-elle une perle géante ?Selon le DailyMail, l’huître géante fossilisée découverte récemment dans le sud de l’Angleterre et détenue par un musée océanographique local, qui l’a fait soumettre à des examens par IRM, pourrait contenir une perle géante. Mais personne ne veut détruire le précieux fossile pour vérifier… Mesurant près de 18 centimètres, cette huître fossilisée, vieille de 145 Ma a été ramassée par hasard par les filets d’un chalutier dans les eaux britanniques, puis cédée au Blue Reef Aquarium de Portsmouth qui ne l’exhibe aujourd’hui que lors de conférences. Mais si sa taille et son grand âge ont de quoi fasciner quiconque, les spécialistes viennent de révéler un détail qui pourrait la rendre encore plus intéressante. À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?Le bivalve fossile pourrait contenir une perle… tout aussi géante que lui. Une hypothèse confirmée grâce à des examens réalisés via des techniques d’IRM par l’entreprise Cobalt, de Cheltenham, spécialisée dans ces technologies qui a ainsi pu regarder à l’intérieur du gros coquillage. D’après les images IRM qu’ils ont réussi à obtenir, l’huître semble en effet contenir un objet arrondi de la taille d’une balle de golf. Une idée qui est loin de laisser indifférent les spécialistes.”Avoir une perle de la taille d’une balle de golf serait exceptionnel. Les plus grandes qui aient été trouvées font environ la moitié de cette taille”, a déclaré Geoffrey Munn, expert en joaillerie. Toutefois, il est bien possible qu’on ne voit jamais cette fameuse perle autrement que par des images IRM. En effet, pour les scientifiques, il semble hors de question d’ouvrir le précieux fossile – et donc de le détruire – pour mettre la main sur l’hypothétique précieuse concrétion…”Il y a évidemment une chance sur un million qu’elle contienne quelque chose, mais, en se fiant uniquement aux dimensions de la coque, [il s’agirait] alors d’une perle de la taille d’une balle de golf”, a néanmoins confirmé Lindsay Holloway, de l’aquarium de Portsmouth.Le 26 juillet 2012 à 19:40 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Brendan Rodgers wants Celtic to fight in UEL

first_imgThe 2018-2019 UEFA Europa League starts for the Scottish team on Thursday when they host Norway’s Rosenborg BKAfter tying with St. Mirren on Friday in the Scottish Premiership, Celtic is now prepared to go starts its 2018-2019 UEFA Europa League season.The Glasgow club will host Norway’s Rosenborg at Celtic Park this Thursday.And after many experts have said the Scottish team will get to the final of the competition, coach Brendan Rodgers believes is time to fight.Mikey Johnston, CelticJohnston is disappointed after being injured Manuel R. Medina – September 11, 2019 Celtic winger Mikey Johnston was disappointed to miss Scotland Under 21 national team’s victories over San Marino and Croatia, and he hopes he can return to play soon.“I see lots of stories and reports about us getting to the final. That’s a long way away,” Rodgers told The 4th Official.“You only have to look at the teams and the caliber of clubs and financial resources in this competition. However, it’s the group stage and we have earned the right to be there. Now we have to fight to show we can come out of the group stage.”“I just think in terms of where it was for Celtic then (2003) is totally different to where it’s at now, Celtic were taking players out of the top end of the Premier League. So that tells you where they were as a club in terms of finance and that sort of ambition really,” he explained.“It’s a different team, a different era that we are in but we are no less ambitious and we look forward to working with the players we have here to gain hopefully another run of great experiences in Europe this season.”last_img read more

Kansai corporate group recommends opening Osaka IR before 2025

first_img RelatedPosts The Kansai Association of Corporate Executives has called for Osaka’s IR bid and development process to be expedited in order to ensure an integrated resort can be opened on Yumeshima island before the 2025 World Expo.According to local media reports, the Association has released a report titled “6 Recommendations for Osaka’s application guidelines – all hands on deck for Osaka/Kansai IR opening before the World Expo”. Japan to conduct nationwide prefectural survey to confirm IR intentions Osaka approves Yumeshima site for commercial development in latest IR move Load More At the top of the agenda is the verdict that it should be made “possible to open the IR property for business prior to the 2025 World Expo.” If that deadline is not met, there will be legitimate concerns that the opening of the IR business would be significantly delayed due to construction restrictions that will be in place while the expo is running.As a countermeasure, the Association proposes early regional approval and a speeding up of the legal process as well as expediting construction by establishing the “Yumeshima Development and Maintenance Headquarters”. Ideally there would be a cooperative framework between the national government, Osaka prefecture and city, the IR operator and all related private corporations.The remaining five recommendations include:– Ensuring the transparency of the IR selection process– Early establishment of a new organization for the MICE bid and creation– Application of casino contributions to the tourism and cultural arts of Kansai– Organization of stress-free customer remittance function(s)– Generating synergy between the IR property and the ExpoThe report also touches on the need to formulate a plan to utilize the entirety of the vast Yumeshima site after the Expo has ended and gaining a better understanding of the concerns of local residents regarding an IR. Huawei Japan joins Kansai Economic Federation with eye on World Expo 2025 and Osaka IRlast_img read more

33 do not offer employees support for dementia

first_imgA third (33%) of respondents state that their employer does not offer any additional help or support for staff with dementia, according to research by PMI Health Group.Its survey of 1,197 British employees aged between 18 and 64 years old, also found that 7% of respondents either have or work with someone with dementia.In addition, more than half (54%) of these respondents have received no education or training on dementia from their employer.Mike Blake (pictured), director at PMI Health Group, part of Willis Towers Watson, said: “Employees can be affected as both sufferers and carers but [organisations] can make a difference by introducing clear policies on how they can provide support and improve staff awareness.“By establishing an inclusive, dementia-friendly, working environment, [organisations] can give carers and employees with dementia the opportunity to continue playing an active and important role in the workplace. Furthermore, those diagnosed with the condition would be more likely to report it to their employer and seek support.“Measures can include early intervention from occupational health professionals and the inclusion of information about dementia, and local support services, in staff newsletters and noticeboards.”last_img read more

APUs Elders in Residence

first_imgCall 550-8422 (Anchorage) or 1-800-478-8255 (statewide) during the live broadcastPost your comment before, during or after the live broadcast (comments may be read on air).Send email to talk@alaskapublic.org (comments may be read on air)LIVE Broadcast: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. on APRN stations statewide.SUBSCRIBE: Get Talk of Alaska updates automatically by email, RSS or podcast. Alaska Pacific University or APU in Anchorage is working towards becoming a tribal university, so what does that mean? On the next Talk of Alaska, artists Joe and Martha Senungetuk will discuss their work as APU’s elders in residence. They’re teaching art and culture and bringing in other Native artists for classes.Listen nowHOST: Lori TownsendGUESTS:Native artists Joe and Martha SenungetukDr. Bob Onders, President – Alaska Pacific Universitylast_img read more

Students in UP government schools to do yoga

first_imgLucknow: Students in government primary schools will now begin their day with yoga classes. Basic Education Minister Satish Dwiwedi has directed officials to implement the yoga schedule with immediate effect. The Minister has told officials to ensure that the 1.5 crore students in the government primary schools participate in a 15-minute yoga session during the morning assembly. Also, children should attend a 15-minute PT class before the school ends. Also Read – Shah urges women to shun plastic bags Advertise With Us Following the recent controversy over students at a primary school in Mirzapur being served ‘roti-salt’ as midday meal, Dwiwedi has directed officials to constitute flying squads in all the divisions to monitor distribution of the midday meal, books, socks and shoes, school bag, and uniforms. He also sought an action plan till 2022 and a third-party social audit on the primary and upper primary schools. Also Read – Free bus travel for women gets Cabinet nod Advertise With Us Meanwhile, another video has emerged of children in a government school being served the midday meal on banana leaves. It was said that Muslim children were asked to eat on leaves, but a probe has revealed that the video is three-week old and of the two children seen eating on banana leaves, one is a Muslim and the other a Hindu. Official sources said that the children had forgotten to bring their plates, and that the children themselves offered to eat on the banana leaves.last_img read more

Sachin Tendulkar MS Dhoni not good enough Shahid Afridi picks his alltime

first_imgFormer Pakistan captain Shahid Afridi has named his World Cup playing XI and there are a number of surprising picks in his side. While Virat Kohli is the only Indian in the team, there is no place for Sachin Tendulkar or MS Dhoni.There is little doubt over the inclusion of Virat Kohli in Afridi’s XI as he is perhaps the greatest ODI batsman in recent times. But there is bound to be a great deal of surprise over the exclusion of Tendulkar and Dhoni. Sachin, who has featured in six editions of the quadrennial event, has scored 2278 runs in 44 innings at an average of 56.95 with 16 half-centuries and six centuries. He has been the leading run-scorer in 1999 and 2003 and was one of the the key men behind India’s surge in 2011 also.Afridi’s World Cup playing XI: Shahid AfridiReutersSaeed Anwar, Adam Gilchrist, Ricky Ponting, Virat Kohli, Inzamam ul-Haq, Jacques Kallis, Wasim Akram, Glenn McGrath, Shane Warne, Shoaib Akhtar, Saqlain MushtaqDhoni, on the other hand, has won everything possible as India’s captain, and is arguably the greatest finisher in ODI cricket. He led India to triumphs in 2011 World Cup, 2013 Champions Trophy and in 2007 World T20. After struggling for a while, Mahi has regained his form in the recent past and remains one of the key members of this Indian side. MS Dhoni led India to the 2011 World Cup triumphRitam Banerjee/Getty ImagesIndia captain Virat Kohli has reiterated that he still thinks Dhoni remains invaluable to the side and will be critical to India’s hopes in the upcoming World Cup. “He (MS Dhoni) is one person who knows the game inside out, who understands the game from ball 1 to ball 300 on the field,” Kohli told India Today in an interview last month.”I won’t say it is a luxury to have him but I am fortunate to have a mind like that from behind the stumps. At the end of the day, I want to be involved in strategy with the team management with Mahi bhai and Rohit (Sharma),” the skipper further added.Afridi also spoke about Pakistan’s World Cup squad and said that personally, he would miss Mohammad Amir because of his suitability to English conditions and Wahab Riaz due to his pace. However, he did express the hope that Pakistan goes all the way and wins the trophy.last_img read more

Rohingya protests on crackdown anniv draw global attention

first_imgRohingya refugees take part in a protest at the Kutupalong refugee camp to mark the one year anniversary of their exodus in Cox`s Bazar, Bangladesh, on 25 August 2018. Photo: ReutersThousands of Myanmar nationals of Rohingya Muslim community held protest rallies on Saturday and demanded guarantee of their safe return to their motherland.They demonstrated for justice on Saturday, marking the first anniversary of Myanmar’s military crackdown that forced more than 700,000 Rohingyas to leave home and take shelter in camps in Cox’s Bazar.They staged protest rallies at different camps in Ukhia and Teknaf upazilas, Prothom Alo correspondent Abdul Quddus reported from the spot.The day also marks the killing of around 23,000 Rohingyas, rape of 18,000 women and arson on their houses in Rakhine state of Myanmar.As consequence of Myanmar’s ‘ethnic cleansing’, more than 1.1 million Rohingyas including those who came in earlier, have been living in Bangladesh.On Saturday, the Rohingya men and women came out of their camps and held banners and placards showing their demand for declaring the 25 August a ‘Mass Killing Day’ worldwide.They appealed to the international community to provide the displaced Rohingyas adequate compensation and exerting pressure on Myanmar to repatriate them honourably.According to an AFP report: Many wept as they recalled the brutal killings and rapes inflicted on the Muslim minority last year as 700,000 fled across the border.The biggest refugee camp in the world is rigidly controlled by Bangladesh authorities and the peaceful but charged Rohingya marches and rallies seen there were unprecedented.“We are Rohingya, we want justice,” people chanted in the Kutupalong camp, where a giant banner proclaimed: “Never Again: Rohingya Genocide Remembrance Day. 25 August, 2018.”Rohingya refugees take part in a protest at the Kutupalong refugee camp to mark the one year anniversary of their exodus in Cox`s Bazar, Bangladesh, on 25 August 2018. Photo: ReutersIn a different part of the camp, thousands of women and children marched behind a huge poster declaring: “365 days of crying. Now I am angry.”Rohingya militants staged attacks on Myanmar police posts on August 25 last year, sparking a bloody crackdown in Rakhine state.Nearly 7,000 Rohingya were killed in the first month, according to Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF).Refugees arrived in Bangladesh on foot or in flimsy boats. Many brought horrific stories of sexual violence, torture and villages burned to the ground.Columns of people marching through the camp on Saturday waved banners and chanted “Allahu Akbar” (God is Great).Tears flowed as one Imam gave a sermon, saying “Please Allah, return to us our homeland. Let us see our parents’ graves. We left them back in Myanmar.”Myanmar authorities, who insist their forces only targeted insurgents, have made an agreement with Bangladesh to repatriate refugees but only a handful have gone back.Rohingya leaders say the exiles will not return home unless their safety is guaranteed.No home, no hope -Myanmar’s civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi this week said it was up to Bangladesh “to decide how quickly” repatriation of the refugees can be accomplished.She said the “terrorist threat” posed by Rohingya militants remains “real and present”.The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, which has been blamed for attacks in Myanmar, issued an anniversary statement in which it condemned Myanmar’s “terrorist government and genocidal military”.Mohammad Hossain, a 40-year-old protester at Kutupalong, said: “We are here remember to 25 August. We want justice.“We want them (Myanmar) to recognise us as Rohingya. We are very sad because we are not in our native land.”The Rohingya were stripped of their citizenship decades ago by Myanmar and have been chased from the country in successive convulsions of violence.About 300,000 were already in the camps in Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar district and the latest arrivals pushed numbers to one million.Banners are seen as Rohingya refugee women take part in a protest at the Kutupalong refugee camp to mark the one year anniversary of their exodus in Cox`s Bazar, Bangladesh, on 25 August 2018. Photo: ReutersThe Rohingya and aid agencies are most worried about the uncertain future of the refugees, who are stateless and seemingly unwanted in Bangladesh while conditions in their Rakhine homeland remain dangerous.International Red Cross Committee president Peter Maurer, who visited the camps and Rakhine in July, said in an anniversary statement that Rohingya in both places were “living in misery”.“Unfortunately, since my visit we have not seen tangible improvements for those displaced or the few who remain in Rakhine.”The Red Cross chief called for urgent “sustainable solutions” for “safe, dignified and voluntary returns as soon as possible.”He said this must include “political steps” in Myanmar and Bangladesh.While the Rohingya exodus from western Myanmar continues, with refugees still trickling over the border, the United Nations and international rights groups say conditions are not ready for their return.“It may be decades until they can safely return to Myanmar, if ever,” said MSF head of mission in Bangladesh Pavlo Kolovos in a statement.Calls have mounted for Myanmar’s military to be held responsible for the campaign and the United States has sanctioned two army brigades and several commanders who oversaw the expulsion.There have also been calls for an International Criminal Court inquiry but Myanmar has bristled at international criticism.Humanitarian agencies spearheading the relief effort in Bangladesh say just one-third of the roughly $1 billion needed for the refugees until March has been raised.last_img

Fifth grader girl gangraped

first_imgProthom Alo illustrationPolice arrested a young man on charges of gang-raping a fifth grader girl in Rajbari. The victim’s father lodged a case in this regard accusing Milon Molla, 28, and Rezaul, both horse carriage drivers by profession. According to the case statement, the girl was cutting grass in a field for cattle near her home on Friday afternoon. Then, Milon and Rezaul took the girl to a corn field forcefully and gang-raped her, it reads. The girl came back home and informed her mother about the gang rape,it adds. The girl is now undergoing treatment at Rajbari Sadar Hospital. Police arrested Milon on Saturday night but Rezaul is still fugitive. “We’re trying to arrest Rezaul,” said inspector of Rajbari sadar police station Mohammad Abdullah Al Tayabir and also investigation officer of the case. Accused Milon primarily refused his involvement of gang-raping the girl but said that Rezaul raped her, police said. Resident medical officer of Rajbari Sadar Hospital Ali Ahsan Tuhin told Prothom Alo, “We’ve collected evidences of rape and sent them to Dhaka. The incident will be clearer after we get the report.”last_img read more

Efforts to close canal to Great Lakes

first_img Carp barriers to Great Lakes may fall Efforts are underway to try and get the river locks on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal closed in order to stop the spread of two invasive species of fish known as the Asian carp and the Snakehead. Explore further Citation: Efforts to close canal to Great Lakes (2011, August 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-efforts-canal-great-lakes.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com Asian carp DNA has been discovered in Lake Calumet in Illinois despite an electric fence that has been placed downriver in an effort to stop them from passing. Last week biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources scoured Lake Calumet for the Asian carp but found none.Asian carp has been found in the Mississippi River and as close as 25 miles from Lake Michigan. Biologists believe they must keep them out of the Great Lakes or many native fish species will be threatened.But Asian carp is not their only concern anymore. The Northern Snakehead is a fish that is raising far more fear when it comes to the delicate ecosystem in the Great Lakes. This fish is known to be able to survive icy waters, is a ravenous predator, breathes air and is able to survive out of water for days as long as it stays moist.The other fear is the Snakehead’s ability to survive out of water. Not only can they breathe air, but they can wiggle out of the water and move on land in search of other watering holes. Back in 2008, a local Arkansas farmer Russell Bonner found one on the side of the road near a flooded culvert. Because it was not a species of fish he recognized he picked it up and threw it in the back of his truck. The next day, expecting to find a dead fish, he discovered the fish was still alive and called the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.It has been discovered in nine states ranging from California to Maryland and they are spreading in the Potomac River and biologists believe they may already be in the Mississippi river as well. Last year, Time magazine named the Snakehead to its top 10 list of invasive species and last month they were listed as one of 10 invasive species that create a high risk of invading the Mississippi River Basin and the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal.Between the Snakehead and the Asian carp and the risk they pose to the Great Lakes, biologists believe it is essential to permanently block the canal waterway and protect the Great Lakes. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Most Links Between Personality Traits and Life Outcomes Are Replicable Study Shows

first_imgPrior to conducting the study, Soto preregistered the studyhypotheses, design, materials, and analysis plans on the Open ScienceFramework. Ultimately, the study represents a first step in examining the reliability of trait–outcomes associations. Soto does note certain aspects of the LOOPR Project that mayaccount for some of the differences in the findings. Whereas the replicationattempts were based on self-report surveys completed by groups of onlineparticipants, some of the original studies collected data in a different way(i.e., following people over time), used a different method (i.e., in-personinterviews), or drew from a different sample (i.e., community-based sample). Whenboth the original study and replication attempt used self-report measures, forexample, the replication effect sizes tended to be larger. “This suggests that personality research can still benefitfrom current efforts to improve the robustness of our science,” he says. “The key reason for optimism is that the replicability estimates from this project are pretty high — true personality–outcome associations don’t seem to be outnumbered by false positives or flukes,” says Soto. “However, the replicability estimates are still a bit lower than we would expect if the personality literature didn’t have any problems with false positive results, selective reporting, or publication bias.” A total of more than 6,100 adults, from four online samples of participants, completed surveys for the study. The surveys included a version of the widely used Big Five Inventory to measure personality traits, as well as various measures of life outcomes, such as career and relationship success, political beliefs, and criminal history. The LOOPR Project aimed to replicate 78 previously identified trait-outcome associations, which had been noted in a comprehensive literature review published in 2006. The project specifically examined links between the Big Five personality traits — openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism — and 48 individual, interpersonal, and institutional outcomes, which ranged from subjective well-being to personal behavior to occupational performance. “The LOOPR Project has generated a large and rich data set,so I’m excited to collaborate with other scientists to bring these data to bearon other key issues in our field,” Soto says. “These include updating andextending our understanding of how personality relates with consequential lifeoutcomes, and testing the degree to which these personality-outcomeassociations generalize across factors like age, gender, and socioeconomicstatus.” All data,materials, and analysis code for this study are publicly available on the Open Science Framework.The preregistrationprotocol and revisionsto the preregistration are also online. This article has received badges for OpenData, Open Materials, and Preregistration. Studies showing links between personality traits and life outcomes, such as marital stability and vocational achievements, provide a reasonably accurate map of the relationship between personality and various aspects of one’s life, according to findings from a large-scale replication project. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The results of the project “provide grounds for cautious optimism about the personality–outcome literature,” says study author Christopher J. Soto, a psychology researcher at Colby College. “Like a lot of researchers, I have been following recentdiscussions about the robustness of our scientific findings with greatinterest, but I was genuinely uncertain about how much this problem generalizedto my own key area of interest: personality psychology,” he explains. To findout, Soto developed the Life Outcomes of Personality Replication (LOOPR)Project. The analyses showed that the majority of the replication attempts were successful — that is, the replication attempts reproduced previously identified trait–outcome links about 85% of the time. But the LOOPR Project results showed associations between personality traits and life outcomes that were often not as strong as those originally published.last_img read more

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first_imgVideo Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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October 22, 2009 – Toshiba America Medical Systems, Inc. will showcase at RSNA 2009 the capabilities of the Aquilion ONE, its dynamic volume CT system, including the ability to save crucial time in emergency departments and image pediatric patients with reduced sedation and radiation. , including the ability to save crucial time in emergency departments and image pediatric patients with reduced sedation and radiation. Unlike any other CT system available, the Aquilion ONE can scan an entire organ, including the brain, in a single rotation because it covers up to 16 cm of anatomy using 320 ultra-high resolution 0.5 mm detector elements, and shows the organ’s dynamic blood flow and real-time function. The Aquilion ONE allows physicians to reduce diagnosis time for life-threatening conditions, such as a stroke, from hours or days to minutes. The ability to see dynamic function, such as blood flowing through the brain, in stroke patients is critical in emergency settings and enables rapid and accurate diagnosis of stroke patients when time is of the essence.The Aquilion ONE offers unique imaging features for pediatrics. Its rapid acquisition time and ability to show dynamic function reduce exam time, lower radiation dose and minimize the amount of patient sedation required, as pediatric patients can move during an exam without comprising image quality.Toshiba will also be showcasing new software upgrades for the Aquilion ONE. For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Video Player is loading.Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Videos | AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting … read more Technology | October 26, 2009 Toshiba to Demo Aquilion ONE’s Capabilities for Stroke, Pediatric Imaging Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Video Player is loading.Mahadevappa Mahesh discusses trends in medical physics at the 2019 AAPM meetingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:01Loaded: 4.04%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Related Contentlast_img read more

Ryanair aim to improve service

first_imgSource = ETB News: P.T. Mr Sattar made the flight change after his wife and three children died in a house fire in England. The revelations come after allegations that the Irish low-cost carrier charged mournful passenger Muhammad Taufiq Sattar AU$270 to reschedule his flight to the United Kingdom. Ryanair chief executive Michael O’Leary has promised to improve the airline’s image and customer service tactics, following the mistreatment of a grieving passenger earlier this month. Shareholders attending the company’s annual general meeting were re-assured that the airline will enhance its website’s functionality and create a communications unit, equipped to handle customer complaints quickly, the Australian reported. Ryanair eventually refunded the money and have vowed to review their often inflexible enforcement of rules which, when violated, elicit retaliatory charges for customers. “I thought, given the circumstances, they might just let me transfer flights, as I had already paid for a return fare,” Mr Sattar told the Daily Mail. “We should try to eliminate things that unnecessarily piss people off,” Mr O’Leary said. “Some of our policies are implemented with a degree of robustness that isn’t warranted… we need to improve and soften some of the harder edges in our service and in our image.”last_img read more

Terry Crews center a cast member in the NBC Univ

first_img Terry Crews, center, a cast member in the NBC Universal television series “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” answers a questino as cast members Andre Braugher, left, and Melissa Fumero look on during the 2018 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour, Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP) by Lynn Elber, The Associated Press Posted Aug 8, 2018 11:26 am PDT Last Updated Aug 8, 2018 at 2:40 pm PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Terry Crews: It’s ‘summer of freedom’ for abuse victimscenter_img BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – Terry Crews said it’s “the summer of freedom” for him and others who have gone public with accounts of alleged molestation.“We can now tell our truth” and not see our lives upended, the former NFL player and actor said Wednesday. He called it “just the beginning of change.”The entertainment industry and beyond will be safer, including for “my wife, for my son and for my daughter,” he said.Crews made his remarks during a panel promoting NBC’s sitcom “Brooklyn Nine-Nine.” Support from his cast mates made him feel secure enough to “tell my truth and still go to work,” he said, also crediting the example of women in the MeToo movement.He alleged last year that Hollywood agent Adam Venit groped him at a party, and that top executives at William Morris Endeavor failed to discipline Venit. Prosecutors declined to file charges against Venit over the incident, citing the statute of limitations. Crews has filed a civil lawsuit.Venit, via his attorneys, has denied all of Crews’ allegations, saying in court documents that his actions toward Crews were not sexual, and Crews suffered no harm of any kind.The actor testified earlier this year before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Sexual Assault Survivor Bill of Rights.Harassment and abuse allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein have led to numerous women coming forward with allegations of harassment and abuse against powerful men, with Crews among the few men who have added their names to the list of those claiming abuse.last_img read more