Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgIn a rip-roaring weeekend of European Rugby several stars justified their sky-high reputations, while others had a weekend to forget LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Nice one, NigelReferee Nigel Owens gave us all a giggle – not for the first time – when he found a humourous and typically Welsh way to stop George Robson and Bradley Davies coming to blows during the Harlequins v Wasps match.The two were grappling with each other, standing up, and after Owens’s repeated requests to “leave it” had fallen on deaf ears, he quipped: “If you two want a cwtch (cuddle), do it off the field not on it!”See the clip for yourself here.Mention also goes to Helen O’Reilly, who became the first female to referee an Ulster Bank league match when she took charge of the Division 2B game between Sundays Well and Kanturk on Friday evening.O’Reilly, a former Ashbourne and St Mary’s player, was appointed to the IRFU’s national panel last December. Huge contribution: the giant Devin Toner was immense for LeinsterSetting the TonerThere was any number of great individual performances for Leinster in their 50-8 victory over Castres, but Devin Toner got the nod as Man of the Match for  his excellent lineout work and his contribution around the field in attack and defence.Eight lineout takes, seven carries and six tackles represents a good day at the office for Toner, but there are plaudits too for Rob Kearney, who made 143m in attack, Ian Madigan, who kicked six conversions and a penalty, plus each of the seven different try-scorers. Leinster looked confident, ambitious and slick, albeit against a Castres side who lost interest in the European competition a long time ago. Dangerous playToby Flood joins the hall of shame this week after clattering into Anthony Watson’s head when the Bath full-back was already on the ground after a tackle. Flood piled in in a totally unnecessary and reckless manner and Watson had to go off injured. Flood is lucky he didn’t cause serious damage.In the same game Matt Banahan incurred the wrath of the French crowd with an ugly high tackle on scrum-half Jean-Marc Doussain, but at least the No 9 was standing up at the time. Happy days: Bath’s players celebrate after clinching their win in Toulouse Record for RhysThe Scarlets may have had the final nail driven into their Champions Cup coffin with a 40-23 defeat at Leicester Tigers, but there was still something to celebrate for Rhys Priestland as his two penalties meant he became the highest points scorer for the Scarlets since the region was set up in 2003, overtaking Stephen Jones on the all-time list. Case for the defenceGeorge Ford often earns praise for his attacking prowess, but it was his try-saving – even match-saving – tackle which really caught the eye in Sunday’s win for Bath in Toulouse.Trailing 25-18 with 53 minutes gone, blindside Yannick Nyanga was charging for the line and if he had scored at that point, the tide might just have turned in Toulouse’s favour. However, Ford hauled the bigger man to the floor and then cleverly rolled him over to prevent him touching the ball down, as players from both teams piled in. Strength, courage and intelligence all combined in an excellent piece of play. Force of nature: Billy Vunipola leaves Dave Foley in his wake during Saracens’ win over MunsterLeading from the frontJames Haskell put in a real captain’s performance in Wasps’ 23-3 Champions Cup win over Harlequins at The Stoop. He made 25 of their 182 tackles, won four turnovers and made ground with six carries. His team-mate Ashley Johnson took to Twitter to call Haskell’s contribution “immense” and even their opponents were full of praise, with Joe Marler saying Man of the Match Haskell was “outstanding”.Another England back row also put in a cracking performance at the right time, with the Six Nations on the horizon. Billy Vunipola galloped 67 metres in 17 carries and made 14 tackles as Saracens beat Munster 33-10, prompting coach Mark McCall to describe him as “a force of nature in attack and defence”. Dragons roaringWales are guaranteed at least one quarter-finalist in the European Rugby Challenge Cup after Newport-Gwent Dragons won 40-29 at Newcastle, thanks partly to a virtuoso performance from wing Hallam Amos.He scored two tries, capitalising on a great break from Tyler Morgan for his first and crossing again in the second half when the Falcons were threatening a comeback. He made 161 metres in 15 carries and put Rynard Landman for his try with a fabulous break from his own half and a deft offload.At the double: Hallam Amos scores the first of his two tries for the Dragons Hat-trick heroesWing Richard Smith grabbed a hat-trick of tries for Cardiff Blues as they beat Rovigo 104-12 in the Challenge Cup. The Blues ran in eight tries in each half to become the eighth team in European cup rugby history to score a century of points.DTH van der Merwe was another hat-trick hero, helping Glasgow beat Montpellier 21-10 at home, while Steffon Armitage crossed the line three times for Toulon in their 60-22 thrashing of Ulster. The SinnersA Huget mistakeToulouse wing Yoann Huget was all over social media on Sunday evening after trying to get Horacio Agulla into trouble during their Champions Cup clash with Bath.Huget fell to the floor clutching his face after Agulla had given him no more than a gentle shove on the shoulder. Unsurprisingly, the match officials could find no evidence of foul play on video and it would be great to see Huget cited for simulation.Tarnished talent: Yoann Huget doesn’t need to resort to diving English clubs had the most to celebrate after a terrific weekend of European Champions Cup rugby, as four of the five Aviva Premiership sides who were playing non-English opponents won. For once the French managed just three wins out of six. Welsh hopes in the Champions Cup have been dashed, Glasgow’s campaign is hanging by a thread and only Leinster are carrying Irish chances with one round of pool matches to go. Who were the stars and the villains as this weekend’s drama unfolded?The SaintsJoseph and the Amazing Technicolor TalentIf Jonathan Joseph does not feature in Stuart Lancaster’s England squad for the Six Nations, which is named on Wednesday, the gentlefolk of Bath might just march on Twickenham in disgust after his utterly brilliant performance in Bath’s astonishing 35-18 European Champions Cup win at Toulouse.He scored one of their four tries, finishing off some great work from George Ford, Kyle Eastmond and Matt Banahan, but there was so much more to his game than that, as his Man of the Match award goes to show.The centre made 90 metres in attack and was Bath’s joint top-tackler with seven. And, with the game in the balance at 25-18 to Bath in the final ten minutes, Joseph made a fantastic break from his own half, beating the defence with a mixture of fancy footwork and pace, and after cutting across to wrong-foot the cover, he passed to Ross Batty, who put Francois Louw over for the decisive and bonus-point-clinching try. Bowing out in styleEngland Women’s star Maggie Alphonsi helped Saracens Women win the English Premiership title on Sunday in her last match before retiring. Having won the World Cup and the Premiership in one season, Alphonsi is now off to make a bid to represent Great Britain at the Rio Olympics as a shot-putter. Who is going to bet against her succeeding? Skipper’s shockerFemi-CZ Rugby Rovigo have been outclassed throughout the pool stages of the Challenge Cup, but they slumped to a new low this weekend, losing 104-12 to Cardiff Blues.Far from leading from the front, their captain Jean-Francois Montauriol missed seven of the 47 tackles Rovigo let slip as a team. Munster miseryMunster went to Saracens needing a win to keep alive their hopes of a place in the Champions Cup quarter-final but put in an awful performance and lost 33-10.“It was disappointing that we didn’t fire a shot in such an important game with the tournament on the line,” said their own head coach, Anthony Foley.It is only the second time in 17 seasons that Munster have not reached the quarter‑finals. They were tactically naïve, came off second best at the breakdown, made one real comedy error at a lineout and even the usually super-solid Paul O’Connell was among the players throwing loose passes and dropping the ball. TAGS: Leinster last_img read more

Six Nations Analysis: How Ireland can disrupt France

first_imgThe defensive game plan for Ireland was simple: let Italy give you the ball. Ireland didn’t need to over commit to the breakdown, instead they would wait for the opportunity to arise then steal the ball. Ireland had plenty of these opportunities, largely caused by Italy’s insistence on playing with Mariana Trench levels of depth.When you are caught behind the gain-line as an attack, your support players need to run backwards before they can come through the gate. The defenders simply run through the gate.Italy lost the gain-line battle 49% of the time, which is woeful, and it’s not surprising they were turned over 11 times by Ireland, more than any other team in the tournament.Ireland not only need to beat France in Paris on Saturday night, they will likely need to do it with a bonus point to win the Six Nations. To do that they need turnovers.As they showed at the weekend, that doesn’t mean piling bodies into rucks and hoping you win the ball. Instead it means line speed, catching France behind the gain-line, then swooping on their undefended ruck.LineoutsIf you look just at Italy’s lineout success at this tournament you will see that they are around the 89% mark. Right around average or perhaps a little below, not terrible but not as deep in the mire as some other aspects of their play. But that doesn’t tell the whole picture – the percentage of clean ball they get is less than 80%. Smart move: Peter O’Mahony offloads in the tackle to set up a try (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Unstoppable!When the @IrishRugby pack gets on a roll, watch out…#IREvITA #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/AuDbjGNobF— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) October 24, 2020What was particularly impressive for Ireland was how consistently strong they were when they had lineouts inside the Italian 22. Winning, with a bonus point, against this French side is a very hard task. It is made easier if any penalties near the French half have the potential to be turned into a maul try.Watch the above clip, look at how hard it is to defend this Irish lineout. Italy don’t go up, which allows Ireland to go to the back of the lineout. It should be that if you don’t challenge at the lineout you have the advantage of getting your drive in first. But because Ireland go to the back of the lineout they are able to just roll around and negate almost every Italian defender.Rising high: CJ Stander wins a lineout for Ireland (Getty Images)This poses problems for France. Will they go up and try to force Ireland to go to the front of the lineout? Or will they stay down and try to drive? Whatever they do, you can guarantee that this will be a key weapon in Ireland’s arsenal.OffloadingIn the first three games of the Six Nations, Ireland offloaded a combined total of 14 times. Against Italy they did it 12 times. That included two offloads in the build-up to this try… Sam Larner looks at the pointers we can take from the Italy victory into the championship finale Six Nations Analysis: How Ireland can disrupt FranceAfter almost eight months, the fourth round of the 2020 Six Nations has been completed. It was a 26th consecutive loss for Italy. Ireland have now scored 50 or more points against Italy in four of the last five Six Nations matches.The stats make it sound like a routine victory for Ireland, and it was, but there was more to it as they tried to change up their game plan ahead of Saturday’s match against France.Related: Hugo Keenan scores double on Ireland debutHere are three areas where Ireland won the match…BreakdownItaly once again led the possession stakes. They have done that in every game of this Six Nations, apart from against Scotland when they finished on 49%.They have had a combined 5mins 12secs more attacking ball than their opposition during this tournament. That sounds promising, but what have they done with that possession and time?Scored five tries, two of which were scored beyond 80 minutes when the game was done, and conceded 20. Both totals are tournament worsts.For 17 phases Italy camped in the Irish 22 but the end result was an Irish try. This from a turnover for Caelan Doris, one of 11 for Ireland and two for Doris.center_img Peter O’Mahony’s offload though #IREvITA #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/SVFj8Rx3HL— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) October 24, 2020During the 2019 World Cup, the way Ireland played could be described as dull. It was an arm wrestle with plenty of one-out, static runners. What Ireland showed against Italy wasn’t that – and the offloads were a big part of it.Offloads are effective because they remove one, or in O’Mahony’s case two, defenders without stopping the ball. Against France they will be crucial.France showed against Wales on Saturday evening that they will feast on ponderous, static ball. Ireland won’t win an arm wrestle, but they might have the edge if they can move France around.The stage is set for an exciting finale to this elongated tournament. Textbook Johnny Sexton storms over to finish an attack that will have the @IrishRugby coaches smiling #IREvITA #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/FGZRu7VNJN— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) October 24, 2020And this beauty from Peter O’Mahony… Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Hugo Keenan’s day is getting better and better…#GuinnessSixNations #IREvITA pic.twitter.com/RLQarerWuv— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) October 24, 2020last_img read more

Bristol v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_imgWe recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Bristol v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, Fox Sports have the rights to show Premiership matches and you can watch Bristol v Gloucester at 4.45am on Tuesday (AEST).If you don’t want a long-term contract, you can also stream games live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers.Kayo Sports offer Bristol v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from EuropeIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein or Switzerland, you can watch Bristol v Gloucester (kick-off 8.45pm) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN.Bristol v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on Peacock Premium, which is available for $4.99 a month.Bristol v Gloucester will kick off at 2.45pm EST and 11.45am on the West Coast.Get Peacock Premium Fans are back at Ashton Gate for this West Country derby Bristol v Gloucester live stream: How to watch the Premiership match online from anywhereFans return to Ashton Gate for the first time in over a year for tonight’s Gallagher Premiership West Country derby.Both Bristol Bears and Gloucester have made just one change to the XVs that beat Bath and Northampton respectively last weekend.Jake Kerr makes his first start at hooker for league leaders Bears while Willi Heinz wears the No 9 shirt for Gloucester.When these two sides met at Kingsholm in February, it was a late Ioan Lloyd penalty that secured an 18-17 win for the Bears.Bristol: Charles Piutau; Luke Morahan, Semi Radradra, Siale Piutau, Max Malins; Callum Sheedy, Andy Uren; Yann Thomas, Jake Kerr, Kyle Sinckler, Dave Attwood, Chris Vui, Steven Luatua (captain), Ben Earl, Nathan Hughes.Replacements: Will Capon, Jake Woolmore, John Afoa, Ed Holmes, Jake Heenan, Tom Kessell, Ioan Lloyd, Alapati Leiua.Gloucester: Kyle Moyle; Louis Rees-Zammit, Giorgi Kveseladze, Mark Atkinson, Santiago Carreras; Billy Twelvetrees, Willi Heinz; Val Rapava-Ruskin, Jack Singleton, Fraser Balmain, Ed Slater, Matias Alemanno, Jordy Reid, Lewis Ludlow (captain), Ruan Ackermann.Replacements: Henry Walker, Jamal Ford-Robinson, Jack Stanley, Ben Morgan, Jack Clement, Stephen Varney, Lloyd Evans, Ollie Thorley.If you’re not one of the lucky ones inside Ashton Gate, here’s how to find a reliable live stream for Bristol v Gloucester wherever you are.How to watch Bristol v Gloucester from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, like Bristol v Gloucester, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN Bristol v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to keep track of the many South Africans plying their trade in the Premiership, SuperSport shows matches in South Africa.South Africa is one hour ahead of the UK, so Bristol v Gloucester kicks off at 8.45pm on SuperSport Variety 1.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Bristol v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from JapanDAZN, which allows you to live stream sport or watch it on demand, is the place to go to watch Bristol v Gloucester in Japan (kick-off 3.45am Tuesday). The service is compatible with smart TVs and phones, tablets, PCs, streaming sticks, set-top boxes, gaming consoles and more.Find out more about DAZN here Bristol v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIt’s little wonder that Sky Sport NZ, with ten sports channels, including one dedicated to rugby, is the rights-holder for Premiership matches in New Zealand.If you want to tune in to Bristol v Gloucester from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 6.45am on Tuesday morning NZ time on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 June 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Bristol’s Andy Uren passes during February’s win over Gloucester (Getty Images) Bristol v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from the UKBristol v Gloucester, which kicks off at 7.45pm tonight, will be shown live on BT Sport 1 in the UK. If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the match, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online.That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when Bristol v Gloucester takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.last_img read more

La Cámara de Diputados celebra su 230ª. aniversario

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 General Convention, Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Por Sharon Sheridan Posted Jun 28, 2015 Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Tags Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest General Convention 2015 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] Con cornetas y aplausos y sombreros de fiesta, los diputados de la Convención General celebraron el 230º. Aniversario de su cámara el 27 de junio. Mientras los miembros de la Cámara de Obispos se reunían a puertas cerradas en la catedral episcopal de San Marcos a pocas cuadras de distancia para elegir al nuevo obispo primado de la Iglesia Episcopal, miembros de la primera cámara de la Convención General aprovecharon el tiempo, al margen del debate legislativo, para celebrar su historia y honrar a varios de sus líderes anteriores.La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la cámara, proporcionó el contexto histórico para la celebración.“La primera sesión de la Convención General se celebró en 1785 y consistió solamente de la Cámara de Diputados”, dijo ella. “Adoptó un cláusula constitucional por la que establecía una Cámara de Obispos separada, la cual se incorporó a la convención en su segunda sesión de 1789. De manera que la Cámara de Diputados es la más antigua de las dos cámaras de la Convención General por cuatro años.“Es difícil expresar cuán revolucionaria fue la primera Convención General, celebrada a raíz de la Revolución Americana, ciertamente lo fue”, dijo ella. “Es en ese espíritu, el espíritu de innovación, responsabilidad compartida y toma de decisiones y celebración de nuestra historia, que hemos invitado a nuestros previos líderes a que se unan a nosotros esta mañana para nuestra fiesta”.Jennings presentó medallas de la Cámara de Diputados a varios ex líderes de la cámara en persona e in absentia. Los festejantes vieron dos vídeos, en uno de los cuales aparecía el vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados Byron Rushing, diputado de Massachusetts, entrevistando a Charles Willie, ex vicepresidente de la Cámara. Los diputados respondieron con una ovación de pie, y Jennings le presentó a Willie la primera medalla.“El Dr. Willie es un pionero educador, el primer profesor afroamericano de la Universidad de Syracuse y funcionario público que trabajó con el presidente John F. Kennedy y el presidente Jimmy Carter, y un líder de la desegregación [racial]”, dijo Jennings. Como vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados, predicó en 1974 en la ordenación de “las once de Filadelfia”, las primeras mujeres ordenadas al sacerdocio en la Iglesia Episcopal. “Cuando los obispos rehusaron ratificar esa ordenación y darles iguales derechos a las mujeres, él renunció a su cargo en protesta. Dr. Willie, no lo hemos olvidado”.Jennings también honró a los ex presidentes de la Cámara de Diputados Bonnie Anderson, Rdo. George Werner, el Muy Rdo. David Collins y el obispo Brian Prior, y los ex vicepresidentes , Muy Rdo. Scott Kirby y Vincent Curry.Luego de las presentaciones de las medallas, los diputados tuvieron la oportunidad de posar con imágenes de cartón de famosos líderes de la Cámara del pasado: el obispo William White; la presidente de la Cámara Pamela Chinnis; el magistrado del Tribunal Supremo Thurgood Marshall y Charlie Crump, que sirvió 17 períodos como diputado de la Diócesis de Tennessee Occidental.“Diecisiete convenciones generales. Simplemente piensen en eso”, dijo su ex canciller, el diputado C. Bradford Foster III. Foster dijo que él solía decirle a la gente: ‘¿Qué servicio le presto a Charlie Crump? Le llevo el maletín; eso es todo”.— Sharon Sheridan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY La Cámara de Diputados celebra su 230ª. aniversario Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

John Danforth llama a la Iglesia Episcopal a un ministerio…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group President of the House of Deputies Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA John Danforth llama a la Iglesia Episcopal a un ministerio de recuperación para EE.UU. El sacerdote y ex senador presenta a los obispos un plan que trasciende las consignas TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel House of Deputies, Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA House of Bishops Fall 2016, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME House of Bishops, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL John Danforth le firma un ejemplar de su libro La relevancia de la religión: cómo los fieles pueden cambiar la política [The Relevance of Religion: How Faithful People Can Change Politics] al obispo de la Diócesis de Nueva York Andrew Dietsche, luego de la presentación de Danforth el 16 de septiembre ante la Cámara de Obispos. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Detroit, Michigan] Pidiendo “un amplio ministerio para Estados Unidos”, John Danforth, ex senador republicano por Misurí, llamó a la Iglesia Episcopal el 16 de septiembre a combinar sus voces profética y pastoral en “un ministerio de recuperación para una nación que necesita recuperarse”.Danforth, sacerdote episcopal, abogado y autor, que fue miembro del Senado de EE.UU. de 1976 a 1995, le dijo a la Cámara de Obispos que “este viejo político sabe que Estados Unidos nos necesita; este devoto episcopal cree que Jesús nos llama” a actuar audazmente en el presente clima político y cívico.Los episcopales “deberían de ser evangelistas para todos los estadounidenses, especialmente para los estadounidenses más idealistas, los jóvenes que quieren cambiar el mundo. Deberíamos de ser las voces que les llaman a hacer exactamente eso”, dijo él.El llamado a los episcopales a llevan a cabo este ministerio puede verse como una oportunidad creada por las actuales circunstancias en Estados Unidos, o como el deber patriótico de los ciudadanos, o como un llamado de Dios, o como las tres cosas, afirmó Danforth.El ex senador y embajador ante las Naciones Unidas lamentó lo que ve como la tendencia de los políticos a recurrir al miedo de la gente y a capitalizar la tendencia de la sociedad de valorar el interés personal por encima del bien común. Danforth arguyó que Estados Unidos ha perdido de vista el compromiso de sus fundadores con lo que ellos llamaron “virtud”, que el definió como poner el bien común por encima del interés personal. La Iglesia Episcopal debe llamar a la gente a recobrar esa virtud porque al parecer nadie más lo hace, añadió.“El modelo para nosotros es la cruz, que es lo opuesto del egocentrismo”, subrayó Danforth.Si Jesús nos llama a amar a nuestros enemigos, dijo él, entonces deberíamos por seguro amar a las personas con ideas opuestas [a las nuestras]”. “Un adversario político no es un enemigo, no en este país”, dijo él, añadiendo que el odio es lo que está perturbando la política actual.El ex senador John Danforth (R-Misurí), que es sacerdote episcopal, al centro, habla con el obispo de Chicago Jeffrey D. Lee, a la izquierda, y con el obispo de Misurí Wayne Smith antes de la presentación de Danforth, el 16 de septiembre, ante la Cámara de Obispos. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Él le presentó a los obispos un triple plan para lo que, según él, debía ser un ministerio de reconciliación. En primer lugar, la Iglesia debe adoptar y anunciar un mensaje claro acerca de “lo que precisamente nos proponemos hacer” y “crear una declaración breve y clara de lo que hemos de hacer”. En segundo lugar, la Iglesia debe crear y procurar tácticas para poder implementar el mensaje, porque “tenemos que ser más que una consigna”. En tercer lugar, “nuestro Obispo Primado nos brinda una oportunidad única de hablar más allá de nuestros muros” y debe facultársele a hacerlo.“Él es un talento especial y no debemos enterrar este talento”, dijo Danforth. “No he conocido a nadie en la Iglesia Episcopal que esté más preparado para predicar el evangelio al mundo que nuestro Obispo Primado”.Mientras los obispos empezaban a aplaudir, Danforth añadió: Hagámoslo el rostro público de la Iglesia. Cada día que [él] pasa en la oficina sería mejor que lo invirtiera en el camino. Debemos liberarlo de responsabilidades administrativas y ‘eclesiásticas’ y encontrar medios de presentarlo ante el gran público”.Danforth reconoció que los episcopales no están de acuerdo sobre cuándo la Iglesia debe alzar su voz profética y cuando debe usar su voz pastoral.Puso el ejemplo de un grupo de clérigos que se enfrentó con agentes de la policía exigiéndoles que se arrepintieran públicamente luego de la muerte violenta de Michael Brown en Ferguson, Misurí. Esa exigencia puede haber parecido profética, dijo él, pero prejuzgaba los hechos y asumía que esos agentes estaban necesitados de arrepentimiento. Un enfoque pastoral habría supuesto que los agentes eran buenas personas y habría apelado a su bondad, explicó él.La obispa de la Diócesis de Washington Mariann Budde, a la izquierda; la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, Rda. Gay Clark Jennings; y la Rda. Kim Jackson, capellana del Centro Episcopal “Absalom Jones” de Atlanta, Georgia, discuten sus respuestas a la presentación del ex senador John Danforth ante la Cámara de Obispos el 16 de septiembre. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.La obispa de la Diócesis de Washington Mariann Budde; la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, Rda. Gay Clark Jennings; y la Rda. Kim Jackson, capellana del Centro Episcopal “Absalom Jones” de Atlanta, Georgia, formaron un panel para responder a los comentarios de Danforth.Budde se mostró de acuerdo en que la gente está anhelosa de la voz profética. Añadió que muchos, si no la mayoría, de esas personas viven en las márgenes de la sociedad, no en el centro privilegiado. Agregó que ella lucha por discernir cuando se necesita la voz profética, y cuando es adecuada la voz pastoral. “Yo sí sé que la voz profética es usualmente lo que nos consigue las monedas, porque nadie renuncia al privilegio cuando se le pide”, dijo. “Usualmente ha de exigirse, y ha de exigirse de tal manera que al principio siempre resulta ofensivo”.Jackson convino en ello, diciendo que muchas veces “el bien común no ha incluido a muchísima gente”. En consecuencia, dijo, ella ve gran parte de su ministerio abogando en la Legislatura de Georgia y en otras partes, porque, como joven seminarista y sacerdote, se sintió inspirada y recibió un ejemplo de defensa social en la obra de la Iglesia. Y aprendió que esa defensa social tiene que ver con las relaciones.“Creo que eso es lo que hacemos como Iglesia”, añadió. Resolvemos cómo hablarles a las personas que son diferentes a nosotros, cómo transigir, pero también cómo aunar esfuerzos aunque podamos encontrarnos en campos diferentes”.Jennings dijo que la presencia de la Iglesia Episcopal en 17 países significa que el llamado de Danforth podría vivirse en muchos sistemas políticos distintos.Ella también replicó una de las sugerencias del senador de que la Iglesia dedica demasiado tiempo a la aprobación de resoluciones que según él no tienen mayor importancia al final. “Podemos ayudar a cambiar el tono [del debate político] y también podemos abogar”, dijo ella.“Probablemente a veces nos metemos en asuntos que tal vez sería mejor que se los dejáramos a otros, pero cuando elegimos ciertas posturas de defensa [o promoción] social, mi experiencia ha sido que hemos podido cumplir nuestro pacto bautismal de buscar y servir a Cristo en todas las personas y de respetar la dignidad de todo ser humano”, afirmó Jennings.La Cámara de Obispos está reunida en el Hotel Westin Book Cadillac de la zona céntrica de Detroit. Algunos obispos y otras personas están enviando mensajes por Twitter valiéndose de la almohadilla (hasshtag) #hobfall16.Otros artículos de ENS sobre este evento pueden encontrarse aquí.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 16, 2016 last_img read more

Ministry with Confederate roots helps African-American children become better readers,…

first_img General Convention 2015, Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The core work of Appleton Episcopal Ministries’ Freedom School is to help struggling first-through-third-graders improve their reading. A 2015 Annie E. Casey Foundation study found that 60 percent of Georgia’s fourth-graders were not proficient readers. Photo: Appleton Episcopal MinistriesEditor’s note: This story is part of a series profiling the Episcopal Church’s recent work planting new churches and other faith communities. Other stories about recipients of grants from the Episcopal Church’s Genesis Advisory Group on Church Planting can be found here.[Episcopal News Service] Julie Groce works for a ministry of the Diocese of Atlanta that began as an orphanage for the daughters of Confederate soldiers, and she is old enough to remember the days of separate drinking fountains for whites and blacks.It thus makes sense to her that Appleton Episcopal Ministries, which she says has been evolving since its founding in 1870, has begun a Children’s Defense Fund Freedom School. Fifty African-American first-, second- and third-graders from the Macon, Georgia, area attended the school’s inaugural 2017 summer session.The school, an intensive six-week summer reading and enrichment program for children living in poverty who need to improve their reading skills, “kind of turns all that Confederate stuff on its ear,” Groce told Episcopal News Service.Sister Elenor, left, and Sister Sophie stand at the entrance to Appleton’s Beckwith Chapel in 1915. Appleton Episcopal Ministries, in the Diocese of Atlanta, began as an orphanage for the daughters of Confederate soldiers. Photo: Appleton Episcopal MinistriesOne of the earliest orders of deaconesses in the Episcopal Church, the Order of St. Katharine, formed at the Appleton Church Home, as the orphanage was first known.Groce believes that the deaconesses “would be so proud that this is what we’re doing and this is who we are serving, because we are still serving children in need and God doesn’t care what those children look like.”The Rev. John Thompson-Quartey, the diocese’s canon for ministry, said that Appleton’s founders are “spinning in their graves, for good reasons.” The organization, he said, has not lost its vision of “being a refuge or a safe haven for poor children. The focus is always on children.”The Freedom School will have its second session this summer from June 14 to July 25. This year’s students will read culturally appropriate books that explore history, civic engagement and social justice. They will also have art, science, dance, music and swimming classes, as well as field trips. College and graduate interns, enrichment teachers and nearly 100 volunteers make the school work.In 2017, Freedom Schools served more than 12,225 children at 173 program sites in 89 cities and 27 states including Washington, D.C., according to the Children’s Defense Fund website.Appleton received a $20,000 Episcopal Church Mission Enterprise Zone grant for the school. It also gets money from the Diocesan Ministry Innovations Fund and the USDA Summer Feeding Program, a grant from Appleton itself, and donations from individuals, churches and clergy groups. Classes are held in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and the St. Francis Art Center, both in Macon.There’s more going on at the school than simply helping struggling students read better. It’s about starting to connect people in an area that has had troubled race relations for decades.“The primary inspiration for Freedom School was that it was automatically going to be a prospect of racial reconciliation,” Groce said, adding that organizers thought uniting the churches and the neighborhood around helping poor and struggling students might be a place to start mending that part of Georgia. There is still the aftermath of slavery and all of its modern-day heritage to confront, and there is still economic and de facto segregation in Macon, she said.“It allows us the ability to have some reconciliation begin in a gentle manner, and then as you interface with parents, we take it to another level,” she said. “And then the community takes it to another level, and it’s not perfect but it sure is a start.”If the Freedom School is providing connections in the community, then the people who form Appleton Episcopal Ministries are all finding wider connections. “Now we are part of this big thing,” Groce said, referring to the churchwide support represented in the grant, as well as the network of mission developers that Appleton joined when it received its Mission Enterprise Zone grant. “It is very inspirational to all of us and it reminds us daily, weekly, monthly of our Episcopal heritage, our commitment to love and to do social justice and just to do God’s work in the world.”Some students in Appleton Episcopal Ministries’ 2017 session of its Children’s Defense Fund Freedom School learn to play chess. Photo: Appleton Episcopal MinistriesAppleton Episcopal Ministries operates out of the Appleton Church Home’s original 1870 building. The building is now also the parish hall for St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, in the diocese’s Macon Convocation. There are 10 congregations in the convocation, most of them small in membership and scattered across the mainly rural southern end of the diocese.An endowment helps defray some of Appleton’s expenses. Since 2014, each congregation has had a seat on Appleton’s board. They pay an annual percentage of their income to support Appleton, and all the congregations in the diocese are required by canon to contribute each year. Some of those contributions are given back in the form of program grants.The aim is for the programs supported by the grants to eventually become self-sufficient, so they no longer need Appleton’s help. “We act as a multiplier,” Groce said, partnering with other denominations and organizations to help children in need.“My job is to serve those parishes and the Appleton board by going to those parishes and saying, ‘If money were no object, what would you like to do in community ministry?’” she said. She then helps those congregations find the resources to do that work. “I have a super cool job,” Groce added.The idea for a Freedom School came after Groce and others in the diocese saw the success of such a summer program run by the diocese’s Emmaus House in Atlanta. Groce knew, however, that bringing the program to Macon would require outside help.“It costs a lot of money, and there are lots of moving parts, and it is not for the fainthearted,” she said. “What made Freedom School different for us was that, unlike targeted parish programming, this was a program we did as Appleton overall, all of us as partners.”It was the prospect of that new partnership, and all the ways Appleton was already working to foster such relationships, that caught the attention of the Episcopal Church’s Genesis Advisory Group on Church Planting, the Rev. Thomas Brackett, Episcopal Church manager for church planting and mission development, told ENS.“They are curating community connections and creating partnerships that most Episcopal churches don’t even have the vision to create, much less sustain,” Brackett said. “They’re not giving money away as a one-off because somebody demonstrates need. They are strategically giving away money to partners who share their vision for creating community.”A student at Appleton Episcopal Ministries’ 2017 session of Freedom School paints a sea turtle. Enrichment activities reinforce the school’s efforts to help students become better readers and explore history, civic engagement and social justice. Freedom School scholars are encouraged to make a difference in their families, their community and the world. Photo: Appleton Episcopal MinistriesBrackett said the Genesis Group was intrigued by Appleton’s pledge that “the leadership there is fully supported by the diocese in the work of bringing area congregations together to consolidate their energies in engaging people who, historically, would never come to the Episcopal Church.”They are engaging those people, not to invite them to come to church, but to minister with them in their communities, he explained. It is not that they aren’t welcome to come to church. Instead, the Appleton group hopes that “as they develop these ministries, they’ll spin off new worshipping communities as well, each with their own unique character,” Brackett said.Appleton’s grant application not only outlined what the goal was, but also spelled out what the strategies for success would be.“We could tell from the very beginning that these people were going to make it with or without funding,” Brackett said. “They were basically inviting us as partners to come learn from what they’re doing.”Atlanta Bishop Rob Wright gave Appleton a glowing recommendation, Brackett said, and told the Genesis Group that the diocese was lucky to have the Episcopalians in the Macon Convocation as part of the diocese. Many of them were not born into the Episcopal Church, but they chose to become Episcopalians. Plus, Brackett said, “They’re dealing with people that we don’t normally have come through our doors, African-American, Latino folks, and they’re doing ministry as shaped by community leaders.”Groce said Freedom School’s first year taught lessons to everyone who helped run the program. It “sensitized all of us to the absolute fragility of the lives of so many children that we had never reached,” she said.Moreover, while the session hosted just 50 children, Groce said the influence is rippling far beyond them. “We impacted three elementary schools outside the traditional Episcopal circle, and those are seeds that are now planted that continue to grow beyond our tiny little field.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Church Planting 2018, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Mission Enterprise Zones, Submit a Press Release Ministry with Confederate roots helps African-American children become better readers, citizens Mission Enterprise Zone grant plants seed of racial reconciliation in Macon, Georgia Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Evangelism, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Racial Justice & Reconciliation Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 31, 2018 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags General Convention, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Anglican Communion Standing Committee backs new Chilean province

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Anglican Communion Standing Committee backs new Chilean province Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Diocese of Chile, which is currently part of the Province of the Anglican Church of South America, should become a Province in its own right, the Standing Committee of the Anglican Consultative Council (ACC) has decided. Before the change can be made formally, the ACC’s constitution requires the assent of two thirds of Anglican Primates.Read the full article here. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Sep 5, 2018 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Tagslast_img read more

Vital role for African church leaders in wiping out malaria

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Posted May 24, 2019 Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Vital role for African church leaders in wiping out malaria New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN [Anglican Communion News Service] According to healthcare professionals, the Anglican Church in Africa is a “unique, trusted network” with a vital and strategic role to play in the elimination of malaria across the continent. Bishops representing six provinces of the Anglican Communion took part in an orientation for new bishops run by the Council of Anglican Provinces in Africa (CAPA) in Kenya this week (13-21 May), where they were encouraged to play a strategic role in helping tackle malaria.Read the entire article here. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

Canadian archbishop reflects on achievements and ‘serious questions’ about future…

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Archbishop Fred Hiltz. Photo: Milos Tosic/Anglican Journal[Anglican Journal – Vancouver, British Columbia] In a wide-ranging address to General Synod on Thursday, July 11, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, outgoing primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, spoke of what he saw as some of the church’s most important recent accomplishments and priorities, as well as the challenges likely to face his successor, who will be elected Saturday, July 13.Hiltz, who has led the church as primate since 2007, opened General Synod’s first day of business with a speech dealing with the themes of discipleship; the Indigenous church and reconciliation with Indigenous people; human trafficking; climate change; ecumenism and interfaith relationships; same-sex marriage; and the need for his successor to keep the church together in the aftermath of a potentially divisive vote on the marriage canon while facing an “alarming” decline in church membership.Read the full article here. Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Anglican Communion Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls By Tali FolkinsPosted Jul 12, 2019 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canadian archbishop reflects on achievements and ‘serious questions’ about future at General Synod In his final opening address to General Synod, Primate Fred Hiltz celebrated the church’s achievements — and warned of an ‘alarming’ decline in membership. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

Presiding Bishop joins Poor People’s Campaign’s massive online demonstration

first_img Presiding Bishop Michael Curry speaks to the National Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March on Washington Digital Gathering on June 20, 2020.[Religion News Service] — With COVID-19 restrictions preventing an intended in-person rally in Washington, D.C., at least a million supporters of the Poor People’s Campaign reportedly tuned in on June 20 to watch a mix of live speeches and pre-recorded clips of liberal religious leaders calling for a “moral revolution” and the enactment of a sweeping policy agenda focused on the poor.“We are gathered today to call for a radical redistribution of political and economic power, a revolution of moral values to demonstrate the power of poor and impacted people banding together, demanding that this country change for the better,” said the Rev. Liz Theoharis, a Presbyterian minister who co-chairs the campaign with the Rev. William Barber, a Disciples of Christ minister and pastor in Goldsboro, North Carolina.Her remarks to the National Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March on Washington Digital Gathering were introduced by Bernice King, the daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., who planned the original Poor People’s Campaign in 1968. The rally invoked the Poor People’s March on Washington of that year, the last major event called by King before his assassination in April 1968.Bernice King, who runs the King Center in Atlanta, said she was joining the modern iteration of the campaign to “stand with the 140 million poor people and low-wealth people urging America to address with the fierce urgency of now the big issue of poverty and race.”Representatives for the Poor People’s Campaign said that more than 1.2 million people viewed the gathering via Facebook Saturday morning, and nearly 200 different groups — including houses of worship — hosted the stream on their Facebook pages. The event was also broadcast on MSNBC and various radio stations. Organizers planned to broadcast the event three times over the weekend, hoping to accommodate religious participants who are observing different sabbaths on different days.The Rev. Alvin O’Neal Jackson, executive director of the event, said the campaign was dedicated to addressing five “interlocking evils and injustices” plaguing the United States: “systemic racism, systemic poverty, ecological devastation, the war-based economy and the false moral narrative of religious nationalism.”Viewers also heard from low-income Americans who discussed their struggles with health care access, wage inequality, labor rights, voter suppression, racism, police brutality, homophobia, climate change, militarism, indigenous rights and immigrant rights, among other issues.“At one time, poverty was a temporary condition,” said Claire, a woman from Flint, Michigan, who didn’t share her last name. “You were on a down slope for a minute, but you could bounce back up. We can’t bounce back up today. It’s permanent. We’re not going back to the factory and building cars and trucks like we once did.”A man named Curtis, who described himself as a “poor, white, gay Christian,” said the “war on the poor in this country seeks to blame the poor people for their circumstances.”Their accounts were bolstered by short pre-filmed talks from faith leaders such as the Rt. Rev. Michael Curry, presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church; Sister Simone Campbell, head of the Catholic social justice lobby Network; Valarie Kaur, a prominent Sikh activist and author; Linda Sarsour, Muslim activist and co-chair of the original 2017 Women’s March; Rabbi Sharon Brous, head of the Ikar Jewish community in California; and Wendsler Nosie, former chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe.“I come here as a Muslim because my faith teaches me that I must stand with the most vulnerable people in my society,” Sarsour said in a clip taken from a past Poor People’s Campaign rally. “My God doesn’t just tell me to go pray in the mosque. This that we’re doing today is an act of worship, because my God is a practical God.”Brous echoed Sarsour in her own talk, citing Judaism’s approach to debt forgiveness.“The oldest and the boldest formula for economic justice comes straight out of the Hebrew Bible,” she said. “In the 50th year, the jubilee year, the great shofar is sounded and two things happen: all of the slaves are freed and all property reverts back to its original owners. This is a holy reset button … Fifty years after the assassination of Dr. King, we declare a jubilee.”The stream also featured short talks from celebrities such as entertainers David Oyelowo, Wanda Sykes, Danny Glover and Jane Fonda, as well as vice-president-turned-climate-activist Al Gore.“We already know that poverty and systemic racism are completely and tightly linked with the climate crisis,” said Gore. “The climate crisis is already causing massive human suffering around the world and … it disproportionately affects the vulnerable — that’s particularly true for low-income families, communities of color, the elderly, children, the mentally ill, the homeless and those with preexisting conditions.”Barber and Theoharis, calling their campaign a “fusion movement” that has drawn unions and low-wage workers in addition to activists and faith leaders, were apparently emboldened by recent protests against the killing of George Floyd, the black man killed by a Minneapolis police officer.The Rev. William Barber speaks at the National Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March on Washington Digital Gathering on June 20.“The worst mistake we could make now, with all of this marching and protesting in the street, would be to demand too little,” Barber said.Among the policy demands the Poor People’s Campaign unveiled on Saturday morning were a single-payer universal health care system, free tuition at public colleges, an assault weapons ban, ending inequalities in the criminal justice system and granting Washington, D.C., statehood.While their goals were overtly political and echoed the policies put forth by liberal Democrats, organizers insisted that their organization was nonpartisan. President Trump’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic was repeatedly criticized, but he was rarely mentioned by name, with speakers focusing instead on what they framed as systemic issues.Barber said his passion for eradicating poverty, including policy proposals, is rooted in his faith.“Now I know somebody’s out there saying, ‘Well, did you get that from the Democrats? Did you get that from the progressives?’ No, I got it from the Bible,” Barber said. “Jesus said that every nation is going to be judged by how it treats the poor, how it treats the least of these, how it treats the sick and the hungry and in prisons. I got it from the prophets that Jews, Muslims and Christians honor. Isaiah 10 said: Woe unto those who legislate evil and rob the poor of their rights and make women and children their prey.”This story was originally published by Religion News Service. 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