Raiders’ Antonio Brown reportedly loses second grievance, is at practice

first_imgThe … ALAMEDA — When the Raiders went through warmups and drills Sunday before practice, wide receiver Antonio Brown was present, accounted for and wearing a helmet.Brown has been working with the NFL and going through proper channels in an effort to wear a preferred brand of helmet. The NFL Network is reporting that Brown has lost a second grievance procedure.Source: #Raiders WR Antonio Brown has lost his grievance for his helmet. Again.— Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) August 25, 2019last_img

Australasian airlines form new industry lobby group

first_imgJetstar and Virgin are allowing Bali passengers to book to alternative destinations. Photo: Steve Creedy AIRLINES in Australia and New Zealand are following the lead of their counterparts in the US and Europe to form a new trans-Tasman industry lobby group.Airlines for Australia and New Zealand (A4ANZ) will be chaired by former Australian Competition and  Consumer Commission boss Graeme Samuel and will be governed by a board made up of representatives from member airlines.It will pursue reform on public policy issues that affect aviation and the economy such as airports, taxation and fees as well as access to efficient infrastructure and broader regulatory reform.The new group will be funded by Australasia’s four biggest airline groups and members are Air New Zealand, Qantas, Jetstar, Regional Express, Tigerair Australia and Virgin Australia.The move follows the success of similar groups such as Airlines for America (A4A) and will give the industry a voice in politically sensitive areas in which individual airlines are sometimes reluctant to speak.It will also give the airlines a lobby group equivalent to other travel-related industries such as tourism and airports.And its seems airports will be high on the new group’s agenda, with Air NZ chief executive Christopher Luxon, Qantas boss Alan Joyce, Virgin chief John Borghetti and Rex executive chairman Lim Kim Hai all singling out the facilities in provided comments. “Australia and New Zealand must compete for visitors on the world stage against many other attractive destinations,’’ Luxon said.“To be competitive we must continue to improve cost and quality in all parts of the travel experience but we are constrained by a legacy of under-investment and over recovery at key airports. A4ANZ will add its voice to that ambition”.Joyce noted that airport fees and charges continue to increase while airlines were offering fares at levels significantly cheaper than they were over a decade ago. “A4ANZ’s goal is to achieve regulatory reform that will promote a competitive and sustainable airline industry in the interests of Australian and New Zealand travellers,” he said.Virgin’s John Borghetti said: “Aviation is one of the greatest enablers of tourism, trade and economic growth in our region, so it’s absolutely critical that airports operate efficiently and that investment in infrastructure benefits travellers.”Rex executive chairman Lim Kim Hai said A4ANZ was critical for regional communities as major airports were “all too ready to sacrifice critical regional interests”. “Rex looks forward to working with Professor Samuel and the Board to ensure the sustainability of all stakeholders big or small in the aviation industry,” he said.Australia’s competition watchdog said earlier this week that the nation’s four biggest airports had increased the amount they charge airlines to handle passengers by a collective $A1.57 billion over the past decade.An annual report by the Australian Competition and  Consumer Commission found that profit margins ranged from 46.7 per cent at Sydney Airport to 33.5 per cent in Perth. Brisbane came in at 44.9 percent and Melbourne at 38.2 per cent.The report found airports were recovering substantially more aeronautical revenue per passenger than a decade ago as they moved to offset increased costs per passenger and grow profit margins. “The ACCC estimates that over the past decade, these airports have collected $A1.57 billion more in revenue from airlines than they would otherwise have collected if average prices were held constant in real terms,”  ACCC chairman Rod Sims said. “Despite these much higher revenues per passenger, ratings of service quality are not materially different from those seen a decade ago.”last_img read more

New Mandela tapestry for airport

first_img17 December 2015In honour of Nelson Mandela, a giant tapestry has been unveiled at Cape Town International Airport, according to Amnesty International.Measuring approximately six by three metres, and called Flying Madiba, the work of art was designed by acclaimed Czech artist Peter Sis and woven by Atelier Pinton in Aubusson, France. It is on display at the airport’s international arrivals hall, and was installed on 10 December 2015 to mark International Human Rights Day.“This tapestry is a fitting tribute to Nelson Mandela, a champion of human rights across the world,” said Bill Shipsey, Art for Amnesty’s founder. “It will provide a constant reminder to the millions of people passing through the Cape Town International airport about his legacy, not only for South Africa but for the world.”According to Amnesty International, the tapestry was generously backed and funded by musicians and artists such as Bono and The Edge of the band U2, John Legend, Peter Gabriel, Sting and Yoko Ono.“Madiba sacrificed his own freedom to see a better world for everyone,” said Muleya Mwananyanda, Amnesty International’s deputy director for Southern Africa. “With this tapestry, we are honouring his sacrifices and hoping that he will be remembered forever.”Mandela received Amnesty International’s most prestigious award, the Ambassador of Conscience Award, in 2006.“The tapestry will take pride of place in our International Arrivals Hall. It will be the final piece of a broader ambience programme in that area which already has various elements creating a sense of place,” said Deidre Davids, the manager for communications and brand at the airport.‘Explore philosophy that places our problems in an international and historical context’ – Nelson Mandela.— Art for Amnesty (@Art4Amnesty) December 6, 2015Amnesty International is a global movement of more than 7 million people who campaign for a world in which human rights are enjoyed by all.Source: Amnesty Internationallast_img read more

Apple R&D spends almost $3 billion on self-driving and AR

first_imgFew Industries will not be Transformed by AR an… How AR and VR Will Enhance Customer Experience AR And VR: Which is More Important to Emerging … Tags:#Apple#AR#Augmented Reality#Autonomous#driverless#iPhone#R&D#Self-Driving How a Modern Gaming Engine Can Supercharge Your…center_img Related Posts Apple increased its R&D investment to $2.94 billion in the third quarter of 2017, around 6.5 percent of the company’s total sales in the quarter. It is a large advancement on the past years, and shows Apple has a few things big planned in the coming years.The most talked about, at least by Apple executives, is augmented reality. At WWDC 2017, it announced ARkit, a new SDK for developers to build mixed reality apps on iPhone and iPad. IKEA is one of the launch partners on iOS 11, turning its entire catalogue to highly realistic 3D images.See Also: What are the scary ripple effects of autonomous mobility?A patent for mixed reality glasses, able to pull real-time data on points of interest, show the potential next step for Apple. CEO Tim Cook said AR could be as big as the smartphone in an interview with The Independent, and reports suggest it is turning into a passion project for the company.The company is moving into AR at a critical time, with Google relaunching Glass as a tool for workers and companies like HP, Microsoft, and Intel all launching hardware and software dedicated to mixed reality.Self-driving is reportedly one of the biggest projects inside Apple, although some say the company has curtailed the scope in the past few months. Originally, reports said Apple was working on the complete solution: hardware, software, and services, but after a change up in leadership it has apparently moved towards the software side.In interviews, the firm’s executives have hinted that cars are but one part of automation, leading people to believe it is looking into drones, pods, or new types of transport. That said, the company recently received a license to test three self-driving cars in California.Other major investments, outside of the normal iPhone, iPad, Mac lineup, possibly include wearables that pass FDA approval. Fitbit and Jawbone, two of the first major wearable brands, are both pivoting to the health industry, Apple is expected to follow suit. David Currylast_img read more