Nokia rebrands all Withings products a year after acquisition

first_imgHow Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua… 8 Unusual Ideas for a Dentistry Business Tags:#body scale#BPM#fitness#Go#health#Health Mate#Internet of Things#IoT#Nokia#smartwatch#Steel HR#wearables#Withings FDA Extends Collaboration on Living Heart Proje… Nokia has rebranded all Withings products and will be retiring the brand, a year after acquiring the French health-tech company for $191 million.The three wearables, Go, Steel, and Steel HR, will remain part of Nokia’s portfolio. Go is a simple E-Ink activity and sleep tracker with one year charge, available for $50. Steel does all that with a more stylish design and connects to the Health Mate app, it costs $130. Steel HR adds heart-rate monitoring and text, call, and notification alerts and drops to 25 days of charge for $180.See Also: Nokia helps make Chengdu region into a smart powerhouseGo and Steel are available to purchase today in the U.S., U.K., and Europe. Steel HR will be available in the fall in the U.S. and at a similar time in the U.K. and other countries.Alongside the rebranded smartwatches, Nokia has launched a cheaper version of Withings body scale, which measures weight and BMI. It is available for $60. Withings original body scale is now named Body+ and adds full body composition for an extra $40.Nokia will also continue to sell the Body Cardio scale for $180.Withings blood pressure monitor will remain on sale for $100, now named Nokia BPM. A premium version of the monitor will be available for $130.Nokia has revamped the Health Mate app as part of the rebranding, it has five new programs: Better Body, Healthier Heart, Leaderboard, Pregnancy Tracker, and Sleep Smarter. The company has added an eight-week wellness programs as well.center_img Can IoT Bridge The Gaps In Modern Mental Health… David Curry Related Posts last_img read more

Match Your Actions to Your Outcomes

first_imgStephen Covey wrote one of my all-time favorite books, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. In this book, one of Covey’s seven habits was to Begin with the End in Mind. To do this, you think of the future result you want and work backward from there. Sound and solid advice now, as it was when Covey wrote it.That said, it’s easy to decide to act without thinking first of the outcome you are trying to achieve.You have a difficult client. They are unhappy with you. You want to call them to defend your actions—and vent your frustrations. Anyone with clients has had this experience, or eventually will. The question you have to ask yourself is: what do you want the outcome of that conversation to be? What do you hope your defense and your frustration is going to produce for you in the way of an outcome? What comes after this course of action?You have a once in a lifetime meeting with your dream client. They asked you to come in and explain what makes you different than your competitors. They say they want to learn a little about you. That’s their agenda and you want to please them, so you build a deck that explains your company’s history, your locations, and the logos of all the well-recognized brands you serve. If your outcome is to look and sound an awful lot like your peers, that might be a good strategy. If you want to differentiate yourself from your peers, that outcome will require a different approach.The key to successfully achieving a positive outcome is to first define what a successful outcome is and work backward from there. In most situations, there are many choices of action, some that will lead to an unfavorable outcome. By defining the outcome first, you match the actions to that outcome, and you massively improve your chances of success.Before you do, think. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

The Root Causes of Your Poor Sales Results

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now An exhaustive list of all the reasons your sales results aren’t what you want them to be would require a vast number of posts. The menu here is what I see right now with some ideas about what you might do to eliminate them. None of these are easy to resolve, as they all require behavior changes and tough conversations. You have to solve the root causes of your poor sales results if you want them to improve.No Effective Role ClarityThe Account Executive, a pure sales role, is often found doing the work that belongs to an Account Manager. The Account Manager ends up doing the work of Customer Service (or some similar role). People in operational roles who are struggling to serve the client pass their challenges to the person most competent to deal with the problem—and the client. When you pull salespeople out of a selling role, their sales decline.Salespeople don’t spend enough time selling for many reasons, including distractions, being burdened with email communications, and time spent taking care of their responsibilities to their company. When there is confusion about their role and outcomes, they spend even less time selling. A lot of the things Account Executives spend their time on when it comes to taking care of their clients feels like work, but it isn’t the right work. They need to own the outcomes, not the transactions.Imposing role clarity doesn’t require a purity test that forbids the salesperson from being engaged in a serious challenge serving the client, but it does require removing them from the day-to-day management of their clients.Recently, more companies are trying to model SAAS companies, slicing the sales role into thinner and thinner slices. The idea is old enough to include Adam Smith’s division of labor and Frederick Winslow Taylor’s scientific management. These companies struggle when reality doesn’t match their theory about roles. By pulling their senior salespeople out of the prospecting role, they deprive their prospects of conversations with the person who is best prepared to help them.Whatever the design of your structure, it should both serve the outcomes, and provide clarity about each role’s responsibility.No Strong DirectionPeople need to be led. More still, they want to be led. They want to know what they’re supposed to do and how they are supposed to do it. They want to succeed in their role. When you deprive them of strong direction from leadership, they tend to struggle. Sales leaders who struggle with establishing noon-negotiables worry about being autocratic when they should worry more about setting high standards.Leaders are often too removed from their teams to provide strong direction. Their communication isn’t frequent enough, nor is it direct enough about what they want, why they want it, and how their teams need to go about producing results. The communication also isn’t consistent enough to make it believable as a real priority.I have spoken to a sales organization three years in a row, each year bringing a new primary goal, a new strategy, a new methodology, a new structure (or modifications to the existing structure), and a new compensation plan. What was most important just twelve months ago went unachieved.Strong direction and high standards are foundational to strong execution. For most sales leaders, the most effective new strategy they could pursue would be to execute their plans over many years with firm direction before ever looking at something new.No AccountabilityNo organization produces the results they are capable of without accountability. There is a lack of accountability in sales now, and you will find it in most organizations, invariably in the activities that fall under the category called opportunity creation. There is too little willingness to hold salespeople accountable for prospecting and scheduling first meetings with prospective clients. Managers don’t want to be micromanagers. Accountability is not micromanagement; it’s macro-management.Senior sales leaders look at forecasts made up of opportunities that will soon be celebrating their fifth anniversary of being entered into the CRM (I only wish I was exaggerating). Sales managers allow their salespeople to hide behind a couple of big deals they claim to be working, optimistic about winning them and avoiding any conversation about new opportunities. They also accept excuses for not prospecting because the salesperson suggests they were too busy taking care of their existing accounts (see Role Clarity above).Salespeople need to be accountable for precisely two outcomes: 1) opportunity creation, and 2) opportunity capture. Both of these outcomes require role clarity, strong direction, and accountability. While I don’t believe any sales leader would argue with these outcomes, there are too few who are willing to impose the necessary accountability. Instead, they tinker with the compensation plan, mistakenly believing that everyone on their team is solely motivated by money.If you want a result, you have to hold people accountable for producing it—and doing the work necessary to make it so.Avoiding Tough DecisionsAvoiding tough conversations and tough decisions lead to increasingly poor results.A person is allowed to remain in the wrong role indefinitely, even though they are failing and unhappy, and even though the leader is unhappy with their performance.The senior person who is negative and cynical infects others with their disease in private and public conversations is allowed to infect others with debilitating beliefs without consequence.The operations team passes their problems to the salesperson to solve, and no one has yet broached the subject of their hiring people with the competency to manage the day-to-day client issues that pull salespeople out of their role.There has been no accountability for so long that it is difficult to imagine how to start imposing it now. No one wants to hit the reset button and begin the process of transformational change.If you are a sales leader, I guess that you could very quickly write down the names of the individuals in the scenarios above (only because they are so universal that any leader would have no trouble with this exercise). Leaders are required to make decisions, including the tough, but necessary calls.Presenting Problems and Root CausesThe presenting problem is poor sales results. The root cause is something else, and probably many factors. Better sales results are only possible when you treat the root causes.last_img read more