Video: See With the Eyes of Faith (St. Mark: 8, 9, 10)

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribe More Cool Stuff This sermon was delivered by Msgr. Clement J. Connolly on Sunday, September 13, 2015 at Holy Family Church. Born in Limerick, Ireland, the middle child in a family of two boys and three girls Msgr. Connolly was raised in Ireland and later, England. He attended Seminary and graduated from St. Patrick’s College in Thurles, Ireland. Ordained to the priesthood in 1964 he was missioned to the Archdiocese of Los Angeles where he served in parish ministry until 1968. Monsignor was Secretary for Cardinal James Francis McIntyre from 1968-1970.Subsequently he was assigned as secretary to Cardinal Timothy Manning until Manning’s retirement in 1985. From 1984 until June 2009 Monsignor Connolly was the pastor of Holy Family Church in South Pasadena. He officially retired in July of 2010 and is now Spiritual Director of Holy Family Parish. His hobbies include golf, reading and travel.Holy Family Church, 1527 Fremont Ave., South Pasadena, (626) 799-8908 or visit holyfamily.org First Heatwave Expected Next Week 16 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *center_img Business News HerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Make a comment Sermons and Lessons Video: See With the Eyes of Faith (St. Mark: 8, 9, 10) Delivered by MSGR. CLEMENT J. CONNOLLY, HOLY FAMILY CHURCH Published on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 | 2:15 pm Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.last_img read more

Leaders: Stimulus funds crucial to ECISD, community

first_img 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Ector College Prep Success Academy Executive Director for the Education Partnership of the Permian Basin Adrian Vega speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American) EducationECISDLocal News Leaders: Stimulus funds crucial to ECISD, community Facebook Facebook Pinterest Twitter A Permian High School student walks past a large three-legged stool used as part of a public education advocacy program led by Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. The three-legged stool is touring the state after appearing in the Texas State Capitol earlier in April. The program aims to call upon Texas State legislators to support federal funding for public schools. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American) WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Crockett Middle School Superintendent of ECISD Scott Muri speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American) Previous articleNORTH AMERICAN HOCKEY LEAGUE: Doherty looking forward to next challengeNext articlePolice searching for driver connected to hit and run Ruth Campbell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR With the prop of a very tall three-legged stool next to him, Ector County Independent School District Superintendent Scott Muri announced the pending receipt by the district of $55.9 million in federal stimulus funds Thursday in the foyer of Permian High School. The funds will be spent over a three-year period.Noting that the ECISD Board of Trustees, members of the community, business leaders and others had pushed for it, Muri thanked Gov. Greg Abbott and members of the state House and Senate for letting the funds flow. Muri noted that the stool came courtesy of Raise Your Hand Texas and its Regional Advocacy Director Amy Dodson.Muri has said the funds will be used to help students make up the unfinished learning they’ve experienced during the pandemic.“The pandemic has created challenges for school districts all across the state of Texas, across this country and really around the world,” Muri said. “And we lift up the heroes that have made learning possible for our students, heroes that we call teachers that in this district, literally over a weekend transitioned from teachers that taught in a face-to-face environment to teachers that taught virtually. We lift up our cafeteria workers that went from serving food in a traditional cafeteria to actually delivering meals to people’s homes, to the homes of our students.”“Today we lift up our custodians whose job has really changed because of the extra cleaning and opportunities that have arisen because of the pandemic. Our administrators have had to think differently about how we do school in this pandemic and our students and families, the pandemic has created a different type of learning environment for each of them. So today, we recognize and celebrate the good work of those individuals. At the same time as all of this was happening, we also recognize that the learning of our students has not been optimized over the last 14 months of this pandemic,” Muri added.Superintendent of ECISD Scott Muri speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American)As the year draws to a close, Muri said student learning is not complete.“Many of our students in Ector County and across the Permian Basin have unfinished learning; learning that needs to continue. We also, as we listen to our students, we hear them talk about their social and emotional needs; their own mental health; well being. Our kids are telling us that they need … their school district to welcome them with open arms,” Muri said.He added that when school begins again in August, it has to be done thoughtfully as many of the students are dealing with anxiety and social and emotional issues that “none of us may be able to fathom,” because of the pandemic.“And all of this requires a significant investment in the education of our children and their well being,” Muri said.He said students are going to need additional tutoring.“We’ve talked locally about providing a high dosage of tutoring over the next three years to help our students complete their unfinished learning. We’re going to add additional days to the school year,” Muri said. “In fact, we’ve added 30 more days to the school calendar for elementary students. Those days come at a cost and we appreciate, again, these federal stimulus dollars that will help us fund those opportunities, not only for elementary students but for middle school and high school students as well.”“We need to invest … in the social emotional needs of our children. We’ll be purchasing a curriculum, pre-k through 12th grade that … will help our teachers, that will equip our teachers with the tools and skills they need to effectively meet the needs of our students,” Muri said. “Learning is different now because of the pandemic and the level of development of our teachers. … We will invest heavily in the professional development needs of teachers in ECISD. And so we have plans for these dollars. In fact, more plans than just that $55.9 million will include.”Muri said there is still funding from a second installment of federal funds that ECISD does not know when it will get. He anticipates that will be an additional $25 million.“We have plans for those dollars as well. Our students need that money locally, and so we would ask our governor or lieutenant governor and members of the House and the Senate that they consider the funds that are available — those federal funds” so they can be used to invest in the district’s 32,000 students.He noted that the funds are needed by every single school district throughout the region.President of the ECISD Board of Trustees Delma Abalos speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American)ECISD Board President Delma Abalos said teachers and staff have worked very hard during the pandemic to make sure the district’s students and families are taken care of.“Whether everybody recognizes it or not, we are dealing with an education crisis because of COVID-19. … In March, our school board adopted a resolution asking the state government to pass on our money to us because we need it,” Abalos said. “It’s not just that we want more money, it’s that we need it to address the needs of our students, whether in prekindergarten or in high school, getting ready to graduate we needed to help them be better and more successful in life.”“It’s nice to say that our school district was the first to pass a resolution,” Abalos said. She added that it was suggested by trustee Donna Smith.Abalos stressed that education is such an important part of a person’s success and that it can’t be done without funding from the federal government during these trying times.Executive Director for the Education Partnership of the Permian Basin Adrian Vega speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American)Education Partnership of the Permian Basin Executive Director Adrian Vega said there will be a superintendent leadership summit May 5 at the Bush Convention Center in Midland in conjunction with his organization and the Permian Strategic Partnership. Vega said this is under the guidance of Muri and TJ Parks, superintendent of Hobbs Municipal Schools.Vega said it will include 50 or 60 school districts in the Permian Basin and Southeast New Mexico, “specifically to strategize and think through the most impactful ways that our school districts can use these dollars.”President and CEO of the Odessa Chamber of Commerce Renee Earls speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American)Odessa Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Renee Earls said the chamber represents more than 27,000 employees from more than 700 businesses and organizations that are chamber members.“… They know that any success in business, the key of that, the foundation, is success in education. Just last week, the Odessa Chamber was so proud to announce that Nacero, a company, has chosen Odessa from all over the country to come here and build a facility, a business that will equal almost $7 billion; billion with a B. As a note, that is about six different Tesla plants. All of our state is so excited to try to get a Tesla plant at a billion dollars. We’ll be getting a $7 billion business, but that business did much research across the country and they chose Odessa for many reasons, but they will rely on the students who are walking the halls of this school and every school in the district to be their future employees. It is paramount that we provide our students with a sound education, that they receive the skills and the knowledge that they need to move forward and have a successful career. Most of those students in our public schools today here in Odessa will stay here in Odessa and become employees and future leaders. It is important that we advocate, and we join the district and Raise Your Hand Texas in advocating for the funds that were intended for these districts. It’s important that these students have a firm foundation, just as this stool needs here to stand, and they can do that with that money that was meant to come to these districts from the federal government. I also want to just take a moment to remind us, because Raise Your Hand Texas and ECISD led off with their advocacy and their words of action, that is why yesterday the government said they would give the money. They heard the noise. That is the democratic process, so I certainly applaud those who made their voices heard that this money was intended for this the entire time. It just goes to show that this campaign and others do make a difference and your vote matters and your voice matters. And these students that we have in ECISD today will be our future voters,” Earls said.President and CEO of The Perryman Group Ray Perryman speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American)Ray Perryman, president and CEO of The Perryman Group, offered some demographics.Perryman said schools in Texas are 52.8 percent Hispanic. In Ector County, it’s over 75 percent.He said that percentage, which will reach 60 percent in 20 years, control 5.7 percent of the household wealth in Texas. Basically, Perryman said that means you’ve got half the children and 5 percent of the money.“That’s not a good situation. Black students constitute 12.6 percent of our student population and they have 2.2 percent of the wealth in Texas. So, you have two thirds of our student body dealing with around 8 percent or less of the total wealth in Texas,” Perryman said.He added that this means those children don’t come to school as well prepared.“They don’t have the resources to deal with something like a pandemic in the same way that other kids might. They don’t have the opportunities for summer enrichment programs, or professional tutors or anything else they might need to help them along the way. And so we have to recognize that demographics is a real issue in Texas public education and it’s evolving quickly. Twenty percent of the kids enrolled in Texas today, one of every five has an English deficiency — 20 percent. In 10 years, that number is going to be very close to 25 percent; one out of every four. That means they come to school, it brings a bigger challenge to the schools, also takes more resources to educate those folks. If you walk in any two classrooms in Texas, if you walk in random two classrooms and look at the students in those two classrooms, on average one kid out of the kids in those two classrooms is homeless. We have a very different demographic here in Texas and it varies around the state, but a very different demographic to work with; a lot of challenges with that. It takes more resources. We rank 41st or 43rd, depending on which indicator you use in the country, in funding for schools. It’s been flat for 10 years on a per student basis. It hasn’t grown in 10 years,” Perryman said.He added that all the other demographic factors have intensified during those 10 years, which basically says we’re falling behind, and all that happened before COVID.“And then along comes COVID. We really won’t know until the fall, the educators tell me, exactly what the impact of this has been on our student body. The best research available right now says, on average, students have lost five to nine months of education. So between a semester in school and education on average. One out of every 10 — more than one out of every 10 kids, about 11 or 12 percent of all the kids had no connection at all with the schools this year. So that’s what we’re facing right now. That’s the situation we’re facing. The federal government recognized that and they provided these funds and it’s a lot of money. It’s serious money for school districts all over the place,” Perryman said.He added that ECISD needs the funds for all the reasons Muri mentioned.“Different districts have different needs. Some districts need ventilation. Some districts need to repurpose spaces in a different way. They need to invest in kids. They need to invest in teacher training, materials; everything Scott mentioned. And one that is probably not covered by this plan, but it’s a very big one, over 60 percent of the kids in this state get subsidized food through the education system. We know hunger went up 50 percent during the pandemic. We don’t know what that percentage is today. We don’t have the numbers yet; it’s big. And a student can’t learn if the student’s hungry. My firm has done research on hunger for the last 15 years, and a student can’t learn if they’re hungry. … We have these incredible challenges, and the census just came out this week. It tells us the U.S. population is not growing very fast and we’re going to need a whole lot of workers in the future. Education is great for a lot of reasons that have nothing to do with work in terms of our enrichment, our community support, our quality of life; everything comes with it. But it’s critical to the future of our economy and the places that can provide a trained workforce in the future are going to have a huge advantage over anybody else when it comes to competing for anything in the economy, because we’re running out of people. And we need well trained people for the future. And that creates some real opportunities. This money can be and not only do the things we’ve talked about. It’s a game changer,” Perryman said.center_img President and CEO of the Odessa Chamber of Commerce Renee Earls speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American) TAGSAdrian VegaCOVID-19custodiansDelma AbalosEctor County Independent School DistrictEducation Partnershipfederal stimulus fundsGreg AbbottOdessa Chamber of CommercepandemicRaise Your Hand TexasRay PerrymanRenee EarlsScott Muriunfinished learning President and CEO of The Perryman Group Ray Perryman speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American) Pinterest President of the ECISD Board of Trustees Delma Abalos speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American) Superintendent of ECISD Scott Muri speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American) 1 of 8 Superintendent of ECISD Scott Muri speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American) By Ruth Campbell – April 29, 2021 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Nimitz Middle School President and CEO of The Perryman Group Ray Perryman speaks during a press conference advocating the federal funding of Texas public schools with the public education advocacy group Raise Your Hand Texas Thursday morning at Permian High School. (Eli Hartman|Odessa American) Home Education ECISD Leaders: Stimulus funds crucial to ECISD, community Smoked Bacon Wrapped French Vidalia OnionFruit Salad to Die ForVirgin Coco MojitoPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

Personal Care or Personal Harm?

first_imgThe vast majority of the 12,500 chemicals used by the $50 billion beauty industry have never been assessed for safety.Dear EarthTalk: I know that there are many issues with personal care products being unsafe for our health, but where do I look to find out what’s safe and what’s not?— Mary Pulaski, Trenton, NJThe average American uses about 10 personal care products each day, resulting in exposure to some 100 unique chemicals. But the vast majority of the 12,500 chemicals used by the $50 billion beauty industry have never been assessed for safety, according to the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (CSC), a coalition of eight non-profits concerned about the health of cosmetics and personal care products.“Many of these chemicals are linked to adverse health effects like cancer, birth defects and other serious health issues,” CSC reports. And with cosmetics chemicals showing up in breast milk and umbilical cord blood, not to mention rivers, lakes and drinking water aquifers, it is indeed a problem that affects us all.Unfortunately for American consumers, these products aren’t held to the same high safety standard as foods and drugs in the United States, and as such manufacturers do not have to disclose ingredients on their products’ labels. That means it’s up to consumers to educate themselves as to what products to buy and which to avoid if human health and the environment are concerns.To the rescue comes the non-profit Environmental Working Group (EWG), which launched its SkinDeep database back in 2004 to give consumers a way to learn about what’s in the products they use on their skin and bodies. Today, SkinDeep—which is free to use and has a user-friendly, keyword-searchable interface—features health and safety profiles on 69,000 different cosmetics and personal care products.“Our aim is to fill in where industry and government leave off,” reports EWG, whose researchers cross-reference hundreds of safety studies and nearly 60 toxicity and regulatory databases against thousands of product ingredient labels to help consumers find the safest cosmetics and personal care items.Beyond searching for your most frequently used creams, gels and elixirs to get the low-down on their safety, users can also learn what to avoid by browsing the site’s “What Not to Buy” section. Harsh soaps, anything with chemical fragrances, many nail polishes and most dark permanent hair dyes top the list of products health-conscious consumers should steer clear of—or at least check out on SkinDeep. The website lists safer versions of all these product types for those who just can’t live without.But public health advocates and environmentalists alike, of course, would prefer that all personal care products could be trusted to not be rash-inducing, carcinogenic or otherwise harmful. CSC has been lobbying Congress about the need for stricter laws and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversight, and last year was instrumental in getting the Safe Cosmetics Act (HR 2359) introduced into the House of Representatives. While the bill stalled in committee, it would have required the FDA to create a list of specific contaminants likely to be found in certain cosmetics ingredients and provide testing protocols to determine which ones qualified for warning labels, phase-outs or outright bans. Whether a similar bill will come up again anytime soon remains to be seen. In the meantime, consumers should make sure to visit the SkinDeep database before lathering up.CONTACTS: EWG’s SkinDeep Database, www.ewg.org/skindeep; CSC, www.safecosmetics.org.EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: [email protected] Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.last_img read more

Emma C. McConnell

first_imgEmma C. McConnell, 86 of Pierceville passed away April 25, 2017 at Ripley Crossing in Milan. She was born September 12, 1930 in Rosehill, Virginia the daughter of James and Carnia (Harvel) Thomas. She married Hugh McConnell January 4, 1947and he preceded her in death September 12, 1997. Emma was a homemaker. She enjoyed being a mother and a grandmother to her family. She attended the Pierceville United Methodist Church.    She will be missed by many.Her survivors include sons: Larry (Bev) McConnell of Milan; Jack (Donna) McConnell of Aurora; Doug (Annette) McConnell of Osgood; Steve (Gina) McConnell of Milan; Mark (Kerry) McConnell of Osgood. daughters: Trish Sproessig of Versailles; Peggy (Jeff) Schueler of Camden, OH;  Rita (George) Anderson of Osgood. 18 Grandchildren; 23 Great-Grandchildren, 5 Great-Great-Grandchildren; 5-Sisters.  She was preceded in death by her husband, one daughter Carolyn Lee; 5 brothers, 2 sisters, grandson: Michael Sproessig, one granddaughter April Ascherman and a grandson Heath McConnell.  great-grandson: Briar Stephens, son-in-law: Richard Sproessig.Memorial service will be at 7:00 PM on Friday April 28, 2017 at Law-Carr-Moore Funeral Home with Pastor Dennis Hadler officiating. Visitation will be from 4-7PM. Memorials may be made to: Margaret Mary Hospice or Ripley Crossing Activity Fund.  Laws-Carr-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements  707 South Main Street, Box 243 Milan, In 47031; (812)654-2141.last_img read more

No interest in Chelsea goalkeeper Kepa Arrizabalaga

first_img Loading… Chelsea have been sounding out other clubs interest in signing goalkeeper Kepa Arrizabalga but have had no positive responses, report ESPN.Advertisement Promoted ContentYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market ValueWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldMost Popular Movies With Sylvester StalloneA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This DayWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Topcenter_img The 25-year-old replaced Thibaut Courtois as the club’s number one – with the Belgian international instead moving to Real Madrid – following his €80m move from Athletic Club Bilbao in 2018 and has established himself as the team’s number one shot-stopper.However, Willy Caballero, 38, replaced Kepa between the sticks for Lampard’s side during a run of matches in February including crucial games against Leicester, Manchester United, Tottenham and Bayern Munich.Kepa has often been selected as the Spanish national team goalkeeper ahead of David De Gea and this development is causing concerns for fans of La Roja ahead of this summer’s European Championships.Read Also: Omeruo’s Leganes offer to buy ambulance for emergency servicesAjax goalkeeper Andre Onana has been strongly linked to a summer move to Stamford Bridge with the future of Kepa at the club now appearing to be in major doubt.A report from February in football.london, via Spanish TV station El Chiringuito – which is not among Spain’s most reputable journalist outlets – claimed Kepa could be a makeweight in Chelsea’s attempts to land Atletico de Madrid shot-stopper Jan Oblak.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

Ruddock to miss World Cup

first_img The deadline for selecting 31-man World Cup squads is August 31, and Ireland boss Schmidt has already admitted he is finding the final composition of that squad a huge challenge. Chris Henry has completed his remarkable comeback after suffering a mini-stroke in November to win inclusion in the squad, the Ulster flanker proving himself ready with an impressive showing against the Barbarians last month. Veteran centre Gordon D’Arcy is among the ranks despite having already played his final game for Leinster, with his full retirement following the World Cup. Conor Murray and Sean O’Brien had faced minor injuries in the build-up to this initial squad announcement, but both British and Irish Lions are expected to be fully fit well in advance of the August warm-up schedule. Rhys Ruddock’s second broken arm in six months has cost the Leinster flanker a place in Ireland’s World Cup squad. Press Association The 24-year-old missed the RBS 6 Nations after another arm break in European Champions Cup action against Harlequins in December. “Rhys Ruddock would have been selected but has been ruled out after fracturing his arm against Uruguay last week,” said head coach Schmidt. “The squad selection has been a long process with some very tight decisions. “Some injured players who are getting close to full fitness have been included while others have missed out due to prolonged absence or lack of opportunity to demonstrate their full Test match readiness.” Ruddock was included in Emerging Ireland’s Tbilisi Cup campaign to help boost his match time in readiness for the World Cup training camp. Instead the Ireland Under-20s graduate must now sit out of the entire build-up and tournament, suffering his latest arm injury in the 33-17 victory over Uruguay. Leinster’s forward duo Jack Conan and Tadhg Furlong are the only uncapped men in Ireland’s ranks, as the double Six Nations champions prepare to kick-start their World Cup preparations. Schmidt’s squad will convene at their Carton House base on Sunday night, with four warm-up matches scheduled for August and the first week of September. Head coach Joe Schmidt admitted Ruddock would have made his initial World Cup training squad, but for the broken arm sustained while captaining Emerging Ireland against Uruguay. Schmidt confirmed Paul O’Connell is the captain of his 45-man training squad, with Ruddock the main casualty. last_img read more