Govt, Angloplat in housing deal

first_imgSouth Africa’s Department of Housing and Anglo Platinum, the world’s leading producer of platinum group metals, have signed a deal to build houses for mining employees in Limpopo and North West provinces. Financial sector commitment According to the department, South Africa’s four major banks had last month informed Housing Minister Lindiwe Sisulu that they had already spent R38-million of the R42-billion they had committed as part of the Financial Services Charter. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material In terms of the agreement, signed in Johannesburg last week, Anglo Platinum is to invest R1.4-billion to buy land and to service the 20 000 housing stands, while the government subsidy contribution is expected to amount to more than R900-million over 10 years. SAinfo reporter Public-private partnerships Housing Department acting director-general Kaba Kabagambe said the deal was an example of the government and the private sector working together to accelerate social projects.center_img 17 November 2008 Those funds where directed towards people who earned between R3 000 and R8 000 per month, the department said, adding that both the minister and the banking sector were verifying the figures and discussing further partnerships. Together with the government contribution, the total investment in the project comes to over R2.5-billion, including social and economic amenities. The 40-square-metre houses feature two bedrooms, a kitchen and a living space. “One of our biggest challenges to fast-track housing delivery is servicing land,” Kabagambe said in a statement last week. “We are indeed breaking new ground together.” Anglo Platinum CEO Neville Nicolau added that by assisting their employees to get houses, the company was contributing to improving their lives and those of their families. Through the partnership, the housing department will release the necessary subsidy for those who qualify for houses under the Breaking New Ground housing project, which is aimed at creating sustainable communities complete with schools, clinics and other amenities.last_img read more

Hypocrisy is all around us

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Hypocrisy can be defined as the practice of claiming to have moral standards or beliefs to which one’s own behavior does not conform. In other words, a hypocrite says one thing and does another. I’m sure all of you reading this article can think of examples of hypocrisy in our everyday lives. I will offer a few examples that tend to hit a nerve with me.Hypocrisy in society1. The general public complains frequently and loudly about legislation and other policies enacted by local, state, and national government. However, when given the chance to express their opinions about politicians and issues, the general public typically shows up to vote in low numbers.2. The national restaurant chain Chipotle proudly promises that they source their food ingredients from farms rather than factories and try to source responsibly raised meats and produce for the benefit of their customers. Unfortunately, these lofty goals have not extended to food safety as they’ve failed to prevent dozens of customers from experiencing food poisoning and other foodborne illnesses.3. Members of the general public endorse the concept of requiring farmers to follow certain animal welfare practices that insure humanely raised meat products. Then, these same members of the public complain about higher food prices and may purchase the more economically priced products.4. The mainstream sports media for years have said that the Cincinnati Bengals can’t win a playoff game with Andy Dalton as their quarterback. Now that he is out due to injury, the same media outlets fear that the Bengals can’t win in the playoffs without him. Note: This is the opinion of an overly-sensitive Bengals fan that believes the media can’t have it both ways! Hypocrisy in agriculture and beef production1. Agricultural producers get upset when non-farm clientele don’t believe or respect the story of traditional agricultural production. Do we as agricultural producers give the same respect and consideration we expect from others when we are asked to hear the story from groups that are polar opposites in terms of their beliefs about food production?2. Farmers will build barns to store tractors and equipment but store bales of hay uncovered on sod ground.3. Farmers try to get grain crops planted as quickly and efficiently as possible in the spring but will calve beef cows 12 months a year because they don’t have a place to house the herd bull separately from the cow herd.4. Small herds that utilize one bull for both their cows and heifers will focus on buying a bull with calving ease for the limited number of heifers retained for replacements, but fail to select EPDs suitable for the majority of the females in the herd that are mature cows. The producer then complains about the lower weights on their feeder calves on sale day.5. Numerous beef industry surveys indicate that March is the most common month of the year that producers will include in their calving season. This is a tradition that has carried across generations of producers even though March typically possesses the most highly variable weather patterns with some of the most stressful calving conditions throughout the year.6. Club calf producers design matings to produce steer calves with extreme amounts of muscle, bone, and hair that target a “perceived” ideal terminal market animal. These producers often keep the females from these same matings with the hope they will make productive brood cows.7. The OSU Extension Beef Coordinator encourages beef producers to put an emphasis on aggressive reproduction and culling practices. This same person manages to find excuses for his daughters ex-show heifers that may not live up to the same lofty standards that he encourages other producers to adopt. Note: This is a painful confession from a person that knows hypocrisy when he sees it!Some of the beef-related hypocrisies mentioned in this article will be addressed in the second session of the upcoming 2016 Ohio Beef Cattle School that will be held on Tuesday, February 2 starting at 7:00 p.m. Remember, the School begins with the first session on Tuesday, January 19 and concludes on Tuesday, February 16, and is being hosted in many locations across Ohio, plus one each in Indiana and New York. More information on the 2016 Ohio Beef Cattle School can be found at the OSU Extension Beef Team’s web site at http://go.osu.edu/BeefSchool.last_img read more

Deepika, Sushil steal show as India regain second spot

first_imgThe fierce battle for gaining the second spot in the Commonwealth Games continued in earnest between India and England on the seventh day of competitions with the hosts edging in front by bagging four gold medals.Teenage archer Deepika Kumari upset an Olympic bronze medallist to win the recurve gold, Harpreet Singh clinched the 25m centre fire pistol gold, archer Rahul Banerjee grabbed the men’s individual recurve gold and world wrestling champion Sushil Kumar won the 66kg title by destroying all his rivals.Vijay Kumar bagged silver behind Harpreet, freestyle wrestler Anuj Kumar also got a silver in men’s 84 kg, trap shooter Manavjit Singh Sandhu secured a bronze while Jayanta Talukdar finished third behind Banerjee.Sania Mirza and Rushmi Chakravarthi beat compatriots Nirupama Sanjeev and Poojashree Venkatesh to secure the women’s doubles bronze in tennis and swell India’s medal kitty.Banerjee’s sister Dola finished third in women’s recurve and grappler Anil Kumar got the bronze in 55kg freestyle as India came up with another impressive display to jump over England and regain the second spot behind leaders Australia.Asian silver medallist Jai Bhagwan (60kg) and nine-time national champion Dilbag Singh assured India of two more boxing medals but defending champion Akhil Kumar made a shock exit in the Commonwealth Games by advancing to the semifinals today.Jai, a Commonwealth Championship gold-medallist, blanked Waheed Sogbamu of Nigeria 10-0, while Dilbag (69 kg) thrashed Botswana’s Moabi Mothiba 11-3 in while Akhil Kumar bowed out after losing to Olympic bronze-medallist Bruno Julie of Mauritius in the 56 kg quarterfinals.advertisementThe two boxers joined Amandeep Singh (49kg) and Suranjoy Singh (52kg), who won their quarterfinal bouts yesterday, in assuring themselves of their maiden CWG medals.The haul of four gold, two silver and five bronze medals took the Indian tally to 28-19-22 while England were once again made to play catch-up with a haul of 25-45-29. Australia were far ahead with 57-33-35.India were also just three gold medals short of overhauling their best-ever harvest of 30 at the Manchester Games in 2002 when three gold medals were awarded for each weight class, a practice that has been discontinued since.The day opened with 17-year-old Ranchi-born Deepika, daughter of an autorickshaw owner, stunning 2004 Athens Olympics bronze medallist Alison James Williamson 6-0, showing amazing precision and steady nerves in windy conditions to win her second gold of the Games.However, it was heartbreak for the 29-year-old Akhil who lost 5-7 to Julie after a see-saw battle. Ironically, Akhil had beaten Julie in the 2006 Melbourne Games final.Akhil was the first Indian to take the ring today and after an exhausting pre-quarterfinal win last night over European silver-medallist Iain Weaver of England, the Indian seemed tired.”A loss is a loss, I don’t have anything to say. I had beaten this same guy in the 2006 CWG finals, he must have done something right to win today,” said the feisty Haryana-boxer.”I gave my best and don’t think I could have done anything better. This is the way I fight,” he added when asked whether his natural style of keeping a low guard cost him the bout.Defending champion Geeta Rani failed to live upto her expectations as he finished a disappointing fourth in women’s 75+kg category weightlifting competition.Geeta Rani, who won the gold in the same weight category four years ago in Melbourne, cut a sorry figure before her opponents — Ele Opeloge of Samoa, who bagged the gold, silver medal winner Maryam Usman of Nigeria and Australia’s Deborah Acason (bronze).Sangrur-born Geeta Rani, who had won three silver medals in Asian Championship in 2004 and a bronze medal in 2003 Afro-Asian Games in Hyderabad, simply failed to match her own skills, ending with a combined lift of 235kg (100kg in snatch and 135 in clean and jerk).In badminton, women’s seed Saina Nehwal breezed through her match as India continued their rampaging run in the tournament with all the shuttlers in the singles and doubles category winning their respective matches.World number three Saina thrashed Sarah Thomas of Wales 21-5 21-9 to reach closer to her first Commonwealth games gold, while Melbourne bronze medallist Chetan Anand beat Nigerian Ola Fagbemi 21-12 21-6 in 21 minutes to stay on course of bettering his record at the sporting extravaganza.Debutants P Kashyap and Aditi Mutatkar also stormed into the third round in the singles event with straight-game victories in their second round match.–with PTI inputslast_img read more