Reporters Without Borders and Arab Commission for Human Rights stage conference in Paris to try to restore dialogue in Mohammed cartoons crisis

first_img February 14, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Reporters Without Borders and Arab Commission for Human Rights stage conference in Paris to try to restore dialogue in Mohammed cartoons crisis to go further FranceEurope – Central Asia Organisation June 4, 2021 Find out more News FranceEurope – Central Asia News Follow the news on France Related documents Download the account of the proceedingsPDF – 184.64 KB Receive email alerts Fifteen speakers (including journalists, philosophers, writers, religious officials, a lawyer and a diplomat) called for talks and a calmer approach and urged an end to the violent reactions to the printing of the cartoons. An account of the proceedings is available. Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EUcenter_img Reporters Without Borders, the Arab Commission for Human Rights and five other rights groups (the European Islamic Conference, Justitia Universalis, the Rencontre culturelle euro-arabe, Voix Libre and the Association of Human Rights Defenders) organised a conference in Paris on 9 February in an effort to restart a dialogue over publication of cartoons of the prophet Mohammed and find a way out of the violence this has caused.Fifteen speakers (including journalists, philosophers, writers, religious officials, a lawyer and a diplomat) called for talks and a calmer approach and urged an end to the violent reactions to the printing of the cartoons.Several spoke about what publishing the cartoons meant while others said freedom of expression must go hand-in-hand with respect for religious beliefs. RSF_en “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says The conference was chaired by Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard and Haytham Mana, spokesman for the Arab Commission for Human Rights.An account of the proceedings will be posted on the Reporters Without Borders website.Those taking part:- Régis Debray, French philosopher.- Mohamed Bechari, president of the French National Muslim Federation and vice-president of the French Muslim Council.- Odon Vallet, French historian, doctor of religious sciences, author of the Petit lexique des guerres de religion d’hier et aujourd’hui (Editions Albin Michel).- Nawaf Naman, from the Kuwaiti embassy in France.- Soheib Bencheikh, researcher in Islamic science and former mufti of Marseilles.- René Petillon, cartoonist on the French satirical paper Le Canard enchaîné.- Lakhdar Belaïd, journalist from the French daily France-Soir.- Arnaud Lévy, editor of France-Soir.- Axel Krause (USA), secretary-general of the Anglo-American Press Association of Paris.- Denis Garreau, a lawyer with the French Conseil d’Etat and the Cour de cassation (supreme court).- Rachid Benzine (Morocco), Islamic expert and writer, and author of Nouveaux penseurs de l’islam (Editions Albin Michel).- Moncef Marzouki (Tunisia), – Abbas Aroua (Algeria), writer and academic.- Marek Halter, French writer.- Noel Copin, former managing editor of the French Catholic daily La Croix Some said a similar conference should be held in the Middle East to try to come up with practical suggestions to end the crisis. Reporters Without Borders pointed out that the crisis had led to increased attacks on press freedom, including two journalists imprisoned in Jordan, one in danger of prison in Yemen and three sacked from their jobs in Algeria. A newspaper in Morocco was also being investigated. News May 10, 2021 Find out more News RSF denounces Total’s retaliation against Le Monde for Myanmar story Help by sharing this information June 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Let’s keep the beauty of our city.

first_imgDear Editor:On Aug. 7, I was walking in my neighborhood when I turned onto Eighth Street off of Mansfield Avenue. I was horrified to see Tico’s Tree Service leaving the block and that 22 mature trees had been cut down. It was the only block in the area with any shade on a hot day.I called city hall and was told that the residents had chosen to have their trees removed as part of a repaving and that new trees would be planted. How is it that Rutherford and Ridgefield Park have many beautiful mature trees and still maintain their streets and sidewalks?The next day I discovered that over twenty trees had been removed on the next block. I came upon one home owner who was furious with two representatives of the engineering department who were telling her that the tree in front of her house had to go. She said,” Why did you pretend that I had a choice? My sidewalk is fine. I want my tree.” Later that day her tree was gone.The scarcity of mature trees in Secaucus gives the town a sterile look and makes our homes and town hotter in the summer thus requiring extra energy use for air conditioning and sadly, little shade. I appreciate the green policies of Secaucus but this is not one of them. Kay Millerlast_img read more