German designers roll out weatherproof shelter pods

first_img Share via Shortlink (Ulmer Nest)A group in Germany has come up with a novel way to provide emergency shelter to people experiencing homelessness in their city.A six-person team in Ulm has designed wood and steel “pods” that are relatively cheap to build, waterproof and windproof, the BBC reported. The shelters, called Ulmer Nests, are in their second year of trials.The team conceived of the idea in 2018 and tested out its first pods last winter. They’re designed to keep two people protected from the harsh weather in Ulm, a city at the edge of the Alps, although the team said that they are not meant to be alternatives to indoor shelters.“[We] spent a good deal of time improving insulation and climate management, to be able to keep humidity and temperature at the best possible levels while operating on a limited budget of energy,” a team member said, according to BBC.Each Ulmer Nest is powered by solar panels and outfitted with lights, an alarm system and ventilation. They have sensors to monitor temperature, humidity, smoke and carbon dioxide levels inside.A motion sensor pings social workers so they know when a pod is being used. Workers can then offer assistance to the person using the shelter and ensure the pod is cleaned before it’s used again.The team is looking for cities to partner with as well as investigating means to manufacture the pods on a larger scale. [BBC] — Dennis Lynch Tags Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink EuropehomelessnessReal Estate and Politicslast_img read more

Guatemala’s ‘Queen of the South’ Reportedly Prepared to Testify Against ‘El Gordo’

first_imgIf the Queen of the South is in fact cooperating with U.S. authorities, she could provide extensive information not only about drug cartels but about money laundering operations in Guatemala and elsewhere. And interrupting a drug trafficking group’s flow of money is one of the keys to dismantling it. In 2011, U.S. federal law enforcement officials charged the Queen of the South’s alleged associate, El Gordo, with transporting drugs to the U.S. from Honduras, Guatemala Mexico and Venezuela. After security forces captured him in France on an international warrant, law enforcement authorities handed him over to the U.S., where he is facing a trial in Miami on federal charges related to drug trafficking. While many drug trafficking organizations employ women at almost every level of their criminal enterprises – from low-level drug-carrying “mules” to “plaza bosses” who control narcotics sales in specific regions – it’s unusual for a woman to lead a major Latin American drug trafficking organization. “She is responsible for transshipping thousands of kilograms of cocaine per month through Guatemala, into Mexico, and on to the United States,” the U.S. Treasury Department reports. “Chacon Rossell is also believed to launder tens of millions of U.S. dollars in narcotics proceeds each month, making her the most active money launderer in Guatemala.” In 2012 the U.S. Treasury department named the previously little-known Chacon Rossell as a “Specially Designated Narcotics Trafficker” and described her as “one of the most prolific narcotics traffickers in Central America.” Based in Guatemala but also operating in Honduras and Panama, the Queen of the South’s organization allegedly supplied cocaine shipments to Mexican drug enterprises, including Los Zetas and the Sinaloa Cartel. Security forces in France captured El Gordo in March. “The fight against money laundering is vital in the fight against organized crime,” said Oscar Vázquez, the director of Citizen Action, a civil organization in Guatemala. In 2011, U.S. federal law enforcement officials charged the Queen of the South’s alleged associate, El Gordo, with transporting drugs to the U.S. from Honduras, Guatemala Mexico and Venezuela. After security forces captured him in France on an international warrant, law enforcement authorities handed him over to the U.S., where he is facing a trial in Miami on federal charges related to drug trafficking. If the Queen of the South is in fact cooperating with U.S. authorities, she could provide extensive information not only about drug cartels but about money laundering operations in Guatemala and elsewhere. And interrupting a drug trafficking group’s flow of money is one of the keys to dismantling it. U.S. officials also named as major drug traffickers the Queen of the South’s husband, Jorge Andres Fernandez Carbajal, a Honduran citizen responsible for providing logistical support for his wife’s organization; El Gordo; and El Gordo’s wife, Mirza Silvana Hernandez De Borrayo. Additionally, the Treasury Department imposed sanctions on four companies owned or controlled by the two couples. Among them: Bingoton Millonario, a local lottery that raised funds for the Fundacion Pediatrica Guatemalteca, a longtime provider of health services to low-income children. Foundation officials were unaware that the lottery company was part of a money-laundering operation. The Queen of the South’s daughter, Christina Stetanel Castellanos Chacon, was also designated as a major money launderer. Treasury also imposed sanctions on two dozen companies allegedly used by the Queen of the South’s organization to launder drug money, including a construction company, a hotel, an import-export company and a clothing store called Boutique Marllory. However, the Treasury Department designation clearly placed the Queen of the South at the top of her organization’s command structure. Some Latin American news agencies, such as teleformula.com, have reported that the Queen of the South surrendered to U.S. law enforcement authorities. Her presence in U.S. custody was not confirmed until October, when her name appeared on an inmate database on the U.S. Bureau of Prisons website. The entry did not indicate when she was taken into custody. The Queen of the South is expected to testify against El Gordo when his case goes to trial. A Guatemalan socialite and businesswoman who allegedly ran one of the largest drug trafficking and money laundering rings in Central America is in custody in a U.S. prison. Marllory Chacon Rossell, 42, who has been dubbed the “Queen of the South” by the Guatemalan press, is being held at the Federal Detention Center in Miami. She is expected to testify against one of her former associates, Hayron Borrayo Lasmibat, also known as “El Gordo.” While many drug trafficking organizations employ women at almost every level of their criminal enterprises – from low-level drug-carrying “mules” to “plaza bosses” who control narcotics sales in specific regions – it’s unusual for a woman to lead a major Latin American drug trafficking organization. Julieta Pelcastre contributed to this article. By Dialogo November 24, 2014 A woman drug trafficking kingpin Some Latin American news agencies, such as teleformula.com, have reported that the Queen of the South surrendered to U.S. law enforcement authorities. Her presence in U.S. custody was not confirmed until October, when her name appeared on an inmate database on the U.S. Bureau of Prisons website. The entry did not indicate when she was taken into custody. The Queen of the South is expected to testify against El Gordo when his case goes to trial. U.S. officials also named as major drug traffickers the Queen of the South’s husband, Jorge Andres Fernandez Carbajal, a Honduran citizen responsible for providing logistical support for his wife’s organization; El Gordo; and El Gordo’s wife, Mirza Silvana Hernandez De Borrayo. Additionally, the Treasury Department imposed sanctions on four companies owned or controlled by the two couples. Among them: Bingoton Millonario, a local lottery that raised funds for the Fundacion Pediatrica Guatemalteca, a longtime provider of health services to low-income children. Foundation officials were unaware that the lottery company was part of a money-laundering operation. In 2012 the U.S. Treasury department named the previously little-known Chacon Rossell as a “Specially Designated Narcotics Trafficker” and described her as “one of the most prolific narcotics traffickers in Central America.” Based in Guatemala but also operating in Honduras and Panama, the Queen of the South’s organization allegedly supplied cocaine shipments to Mexican drug enterprises, including Los Zetas and the Sinaloa Cartel. Security forces in France captured El Gordo in March. The capture of ‘El Gordo’ “The fight against money laundering is vital in the fight against organized crime,” said Oscar Vázquez, the director of Citizen Action, a civil organization in Guatemala. “She is responsible for transshipping thousands of kilograms of cocaine per month through Guatemala, into Mexico, and on to the United States,” the U.S. Treasury Department reports. “Chacon Rossell is also believed to launder tens of millions of U.S. dollars in narcotics proceeds each month, making her the most active money launderer in Guatemala.” The Queen of the South’s daughter, Christina Stetanel Castellanos Chacon, was also designated as a major money launderer. Treasury also imposed sanctions on two dozen companies allegedly used by the Queen of the South’s organization to launder drug money, including a construction company, a hotel, an import-export company and a clothing store called Boutique Marllory. A woman drug trafficking kingpin A Guatemalan socialite and businesswoman who allegedly ran one of the largest drug trafficking and money laundering rings in Central America is in custody in a U.S. prison. The capture of ‘El Gordo’ Marllory Chacon Rossell, 42, who has been dubbed the “Queen of the South” by the Guatemalan press, is being held at the Federal Detention Center in Miami. She is expected to testify against one of her former associates, Hayron Borrayo Lasmibat, also known as “El Gordo.” However, the Treasury Department designation clearly placed the Queen of the South at the top of her organization’s command structure. Julieta Pelcastre contributed to this article.last_img read more

Becoming an ‘Energizer in Chief’

first_img 56SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr No organization is immune to employee disengagement. In fact, I’m pretty sure we’ve all been there – especially on those bright, sunny days when we’d like to be lying by the pool rather than at a desk indoors. Though this kind of disengagement is usually not lasting, there are times when employees, teams and our organizations as a whole could benefit from a little more enthusiasm.One of my favorite leadership gurus, Peter Economy, notes three great ways to become your organization’s “energizer in chief” to help members of your team bring more effort and enthusiasm to their jobs. These are:1. Energize individuals. “The trust, respect, and consideration that leaders show team members in one-on-one relationships each and every day of the week is the foundation of an energized organization,” he writes. continue reading »last_img read more