Sneak Peek! Learn How to Do the Sexy Dirty Dancing Lift on Broadway Balances America

first_img Broadway Balances America It’s time to have the time of your life! Broadway Balances America, the special six-part series airing on Lifetime Television’s The Balancing Act, returned on September 9 with a behind-the-scenes look at the national tour of Dirty Dancing—The Classic Story on Stage. Correspondent Olga Villaverd is in the rehearsal room with star Samuel Pergande (Johnny Castle) and associate choreographer David Scotchford to learn the iconic dance lift from the show’s heartstopping finale, and writer Eleanor Bergstein tells fans what they can expect from this production. Click play and watch the full segment now! View Commentslast_img

Guatemala’s ‘Queen of the South’ Reportedly Prepared to Testify Against ‘El Gordo’

first_imgIf the Queen of the South is in fact cooperating with U.S. authorities, she could provide extensive information not only about drug cartels but about money laundering operations in Guatemala and elsewhere. And interrupting a drug trafficking group’s flow of money is one of the keys to dismantling it. In 2011, U.S. federal law enforcement officials charged the Queen of the South’s alleged associate, El Gordo, with transporting drugs to the U.S. from Honduras, Guatemala Mexico and Venezuela. After security forces captured him in France on an international warrant, law enforcement authorities handed him over to the U.S., where he is facing a trial in Miami on federal charges related to drug trafficking. While many drug trafficking organizations employ women at almost every level of their criminal enterprises – from low-level drug-carrying “mules” to “plaza bosses” who control narcotics sales in specific regions – it’s unusual for a woman to lead a major Latin American drug trafficking organization. “She is responsible for transshipping thousands of kilograms of cocaine per month through Guatemala, into Mexico, and on to the United States,” the U.S. Treasury Department reports. “Chacon Rossell is also believed to launder tens of millions of U.S. dollars in narcotics proceeds each month, making her the most active money launderer in Guatemala.” In 2012 the U.S. Treasury department named the previously little-known Chacon Rossell as a “Specially Designated Narcotics Trafficker” and described her as “one of the most prolific narcotics traffickers in Central America.” Based in Guatemala but also operating in Honduras and Panama, the Queen of the South’s organization allegedly supplied cocaine shipments to Mexican drug enterprises, including Los Zetas and the Sinaloa Cartel. Security forces in France captured El Gordo in March. “The fight against money laundering is vital in the fight against organized crime,” said Oscar Vázquez, the director of Citizen Action, a civil organization in Guatemala. In 2011, U.S. federal law enforcement officials charged the Queen of the South’s alleged associate, El Gordo, with transporting drugs to the U.S. from Honduras, Guatemala Mexico and Venezuela. After security forces captured him in France on an international warrant, law enforcement authorities handed him over to the U.S., where he is facing a trial in Miami on federal charges related to drug trafficking. If the Queen of the South is in fact cooperating with U.S. authorities, she could provide extensive information not only about drug cartels but about money laundering operations in Guatemala and elsewhere. And interrupting a drug trafficking group’s flow of money is one of the keys to dismantling it. U.S. officials also named as major drug traffickers the Queen of the South’s husband, Jorge Andres Fernandez Carbajal, a Honduran citizen responsible for providing logistical support for his wife’s organization; El Gordo; and El Gordo’s wife, Mirza Silvana Hernandez De Borrayo. Additionally, the Treasury Department imposed sanctions on four companies owned or controlled by the two couples. Among them: Bingoton Millonario, a local lottery that raised funds for the Fundacion Pediatrica Guatemalteca, a longtime provider of health services to low-income children. Foundation officials were unaware that the lottery company was part of a money-laundering operation. The Queen of the South’s daughter, Christina Stetanel Castellanos Chacon, was also designated as a major money launderer. Treasury also imposed sanctions on two dozen companies allegedly used by the Queen of the South’s organization to launder drug money, including a construction company, a hotel, an import-export company and a clothing store called Boutique Marllory. However, the Treasury Department designation clearly placed the Queen of the South at the top of her organization’s command structure. Some Latin American news agencies, such as teleformula.com, have reported that the Queen of the South surrendered to U.S. law enforcement authorities. Her presence in U.S. custody was not confirmed until October, when her name appeared on an inmate database on the U.S. Bureau of Prisons website. The entry did not indicate when she was taken into custody. The Queen of the South is expected to testify against El Gordo when his case goes to trial. A Guatemalan socialite and businesswoman who allegedly ran one of the largest drug trafficking and money laundering rings in Central America is in custody in a U.S. prison. Marllory Chacon Rossell, 42, who has been dubbed the “Queen of the South” by the Guatemalan press, is being held at the Federal Detention Center in Miami. She is expected to testify against one of her former associates, Hayron Borrayo Lasmibat, also known as “El Gordo.” While many drug trafficking organizations employ women at almost every level of their criminal enterprises – from low-level drug-carrying “mules” to “plaza bosses” who control narcotics sales in specific regions – it’s unusual for a woman to lead a major Latin American drug trafficking organization. Julieta Pelcastre contributed to this article. By Dialogo November 24, 2014 A woman drug trafficking kingpin Some Latin American news agencies, such as teleformula.com, have reported that the Queen of the South surrendered to U.S. law enforcement authorities. Her presence in U.S. custody was not confirmed until October, when her name appeared on an inmate database on the U.S. Bureau of Prisons website. The entry did not indicate when she was taken into custody. The Queen of the South is expected to testify against El Gordo when his case goes to trial. U.S. officials also named as major drug traffickers the Queen of the South’s husband, Jorge Andres Fernandez Carbajal, a Honduran citizen responsible for providing logistical support for his wife’s organization; El Gordo; and El Gordo’s wife, Mirza Silvana Hernandez De Borrayo. Additionally, the Treasury Department imposed sanctions on four companies owned or controlled by the two couples. Among them: Bingoton Millonario, a local lottery that raised funds for the Fundacion Pediatrica Guatemalteca, a longtime provider of health services to low-income children. Foundation officials were unaware that the lottery company was part of a money-laundering operation. In 2012 the U.S. Treasury department named the previously little-known Chacon Rossell as a “Specially Designated Narcotics Trafficker” and described her as “one of the most prolific narcotics traffickers in Central America.” Based in Guatemala but also operating in Honduras and Panama, the Queen of the South’s organization allegedly supplied cocaine shipments to Mexican drug enterprises, including Los Zetas and the Sinaloa Cartel. Security forces in France captured El Gordo in March. The capture of ‘El Gordo’ “The fight against money laundering is vital in the fight against organized crime,” said Oscar Vázquez, the director of Citizen Action, a civil organization in Guatemala. “She is responsible for transshipping thousands of kilograms of cocaine per month through Guatemala, into Mexico, and on to the United States,” the U.S. Treasury Department reports. “Chacon Rossell is also believed to launder tens of millions of U.S. dollars in narcotics proceeds each month, making her the most active money launderer in Guatemala.” The Queen of the South’s daughter, Christina Stetanel Castellanos Chacon, was also designated as a major money launderer. Treasury also imposed sanctions on two dozen companies allegedly used by the Queen of the South’s organization to launder drug money, including a construction company, a hotel, an import-export company and a clothing store called Boutique Marllory. A woman drug trafficking kingpin A Guatemalan socialite and businesswoman who allegedly ran one of the largest drug trafficking and money laundering rings in Central America is in custody in a U.S. prison. The capture of ‘El Gordo’ Marllory Chacon Rossell, 42, who has been dubbed the “Queen of the South” by the Guatemalan press, is being held at the Federal Detention Center in Miami. She is expected to testify against one of her former associates, Hayron Borrayo Lasmibat, also known as “El Gordo.” However, the Treasury Department designation clearly placed the Queen of the South at the top of her organization’s command structure. Julieta Pelcastre contributed to this article.last_img read more

Mortgage stress down in Queensland but up across Australia

first_imgFewer Queensland homeowners are suffering mortgage stress.MORTGAGE stress is on the decline in Queensland as all other state and territories see an increase in homeowners defaulting on their mortgages. The latest mortgage delinquencies map from Moody’s Investors Service showed the number of mortgages more than 30 days in arrears in Queensland had dropped from 1.69 per cent to 1.62 per cent in the year to November 2018.The report attributed the fall in mortgage stress in Queensland to a growing state economy, up 2.9 per cent in the year to December 2018, and a 5.8 per cent increase in the average Brisbane income in 2018. In comparison, Brisbane house prices increased 0.3 per cent in the same time. However, the number of Queenslanders feeling mortgage stress was above the national average of 1.58 per cent, as well as above ACT (1.11 per cent), New South Wales (1.19 per cent), Tasmania (1.32 per cent) and Victoria (1.39 per cent). Moody’s senior analyst Alena Chen said the decline is mortgage stress in Queensland was thanks to its diversified economy compared to other resource-rich states, but she was cautious about predicting a continuation of the trend.Ms Chen said Moody’s predicted an increase in mortgage stress across the nation in 2019. “We do expect arrears to increase over the next year but because the GDP is below trend but still good and the employment rate is at an historical low, we think arrears will continue to remain low on average,” she said. Queensland’s best performing region was Brisbane west where only 0.81 per cent of borrowers suffered from mortgage stress while in Brisbane’s south and inner city that number was only slightly higher at 0.95 per cent. At the other end of the scale, mortgagees in the Queensland outback were under the most mortgage stress (4.96 per cent) with Townsville (2.88 per cent) and Mackay (2.64 per cent) rounding out the bottom three. Ms Chen said this was to be expected. “This a trend we see consistently in terms of capital city performance compared to rest of the country,” she said. “Capital cities outperform regional areas due to stability of jobs and diversity of industries in inner-cities.” The postcode with the lowest mortgage stress was Ormiston (0.06 per cent), followed by Auchenflower (0.15 per cent) and Chelmer (0.23 per cent).More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agoQueensland’s best performing postcodes for mortgage stress4160 Ormiston 0.06 per cent4066 Auchenflower 0.15 per cent4068 Chelmer 0.23 per cent4179 Lota 0.24 per cent4035 Albany Creek 0.30 per centQueensland’s worst performing postcodes for mortgage stress4815 Condon 5.34 per cent4825 Alpurrurulam 5.30 per cent4812 Currajong 3.76 per cent4285 Allenview 3.51 per cent4650 Aldershot 3.25 per centlast_img read more

After 4 years on court, Goldin looks to future

first_imgUW BadgersOn February 12, 1976, as the University of Wisconsin prepared to play host to the National Intercollegiate Invitational Tennis Championships, a preview article in this newspaper noted, “The Badgers are anchored by Eric Cullen and captain Marty Goldin, who captured last year’s Big Ten doubles championship.”Twenty-seven years later, Cullen’s nephew of the same name became editor-in-chief of this newspaper.Thirty years later, Goldin’s daughter, Lexi, played her final home tennis match as part of the UW roster this weekend, marking the beginning of the end of a four-year career as one of this school’s finest student-athletes.Goldin, who was winning her exhibition match on Senior Day when her opponent was injured and defaulted, is the rare third-generation UW athlete, with her grandfather Mel — in whose honor there is an active scholarship — having lettered in track and field before her father Marty took to the court in the 1970s.”It’s just a neat thing that you can tell people you’re playing at the same school your dad did,” Goldin says with a smirk. “He thinks it is so cool.”And Marty Goldin, a regular in the stands for Badger tennis matches, exudes an equally wide smile when speaking of his graduating daughter.”I am very proud of my daughter,” Marty Goldin says. “She’s had a wonderful career as a student and as a player.”That career as a student is noteworthy, as well, with Goldin having proved one of this school’s most academically robust athletes over the past four years. In 2004 and 2005, she was named an Academic all-Big Ten award winner, and she has the grade point average to back it up.”She’s a consummate student-athlete,” UW coach Patti Henderson says. “Academically, out of four years — out of eight semesters — she’s had [six] 4.0’s and one darn near close.”For Goldin, while her college years may be dwindling to a close, that education is not yet anywhere near over. She has applied to medical school for the fall and seems eager to continue learning.”I do enjoy learning. I would never want to get a job where you’re done learning,” Goldin says. “I don’t want that. I like the feeling of learning something new every day.”But as with so many graduating UW seniors, that future for Goldin remains somewhat uncertain. Over a capellini and salad dinner (she enjoys mixing her greens and pasta), the lone fourth-year student on the Badger squad contemplates her options for the fall.”I’m hoping to hear from Wisconsin Medical College relatively soon … Penn State and Wisconsin Medical College are the two schools I’m waiting for,” she says. “I have no idea right now.”Should neither school pull through for the academic standout this year, Goldin plans on giving it a try again in 2007.”I would re-apply again the following year,” she says. “And as far as next year … EMT classes, I think would be fun.”Either way, Goldin’s competitive tennis career will be drawing to a close — at least for now — at the end of this season. It is a tenure that includes four years on the Nicolet High School tennis team and as many varsity letters from UW.”I walked on my freshman year and I got the scholarship my sophomore year,” Goldin recalls. “I knew that I was decent in high school, but I kind of thought going in [to college] that I wasn’t going to have a chance.”If anything, hard work and dedication got Goldin those four letters. She was a genuine walk-on athlete — not recruited by UW in any capacity — and yet as she was handed a bouquet of flowers as part of a sentimental Senior Day ceremony late Saturday morning, the deep bond between the UW tennis team and its sole senior athlete could not have been more evident.Still, Goldin’s final home match was an exhibition, played with all the heart of a graduating senior but not noted for the record. While a series of Badger injuries and lineup shuffles increased her playing time earlier this season — and as recently as an April 17 match against Illinois — the reality of team ace Caitlin Burke’s return to the roster for Saturday’s Ohio State home finale was that Goldin would not make the official lineup. And in previewing the match over dinner three days prior, she did seem to be at peace with the prospect.”School is ahead of tennis for me. I came in for academics and that was always first for me,” Goldin says. “I didn’t come in thinking that I was going to end up playing one singles of anything. So my goal for me was to always be competitive all four years … but also off the court, the fitness and the academics and stuff, that’s where I know I can really thrive. And I have a lot of confidence in that.”But in reflecting upon her senior season, Goldin also shows a hint of disappointment. It’s been a difficult year for the Badgers, who earned only their second Big Ten victory Saturday, and Goldin has seen more of the sideline than the court throughout the spring.”I feel like I deserved maybe a little bit more playing time and especially in a couple of the meets. And that’s probably the one thing I’m going to walk away not really understanding,” Goldin says. “Especially the home matches, when my parents were there … I know that’s not a good excuse just to put me in. But I know that I would have played my heart out those matches. And it just kind of really would have meant something for me. But [I] can’t do anything about it. I played those exhibition matches those days and tried to fight in those.”Still, in leaving UW, Goldin leaves behind a remarkable legacy and takes with her enough memories and relationships to last a lifetime.When asked who her closest friend on the team has been over the past four years, Goldin answers with a wide grin, “Katie McGaffigan … But Caitlin Burke would probably want me to say her.”The Wisconsin season is not yet over, as the team will travel back to Illinois later this week for the Big Ten Tournament. But with the squad’s disappointing record at the close of a season marred by injury, Champaign, Ill., is almost certain to mark the last stop on Goldin’s college tennis career.Still, the memories of a four-year career will live on.”Tennis has been the biggest part of [college], even more than academics, I feel. Just the time I put into it,” Goldin says. “That’s what I’m going to remember 40 years down the road — and the people that I met.”last_img read more