Each Android User Will Make Google $9.85 per Year in 2012

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … sarah perez According to Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster, Google could earn $1.3 billion in mobile advertising revenue in 2012, or $9.85 for each Android user. The analyst forecasted there would be 133 million Android users by 2012, and he arrived at the $1.3 billion figure by using publicly quoted numbers from Google itself.The details of Munster’s prediction can be found on eWeek, Forbes, CNN and other outlets. Munster had posted this information in a research note earlier this week.To determine the $1.3 billion figure, the analyst used Google’s self-stated figure that its mobile ad business is on a $1 billion annual run-rate, and Munster estimated the company had earned $850 million in total mobile revenue in 2010. Android specifically had generated around 16% of that total, or $130 million, said Munster. That means that each Android user generated $5.90 per year for Google, based on around 22 million Android users in 2010.By 2012, there would be 133 million Android users, generating $1.3 billion in Android-related revenue he said. That equates to $9.85 per user per year.Mobile Still Pales Next to Desktop WebDespite this growth, Piper notes that even an ARPU (average revenue per user) of nearly $10 is still below what a desktop user generates for Google.“As we noted, we believe Google’s ARPU on Android was $5.90 in 2010. We believe Google’s average revenue per search user was $18.85 in 2010 and average revenue per user for Google’s advertising businesses in total was $25.77 in 2010,” Munster said.Below is a chart which shows just how far Android has to go before catching up to the desktop Web. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementcenter_img Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Tags:#Google#mobile#news#web last_img read more

IAAF allows 21 more Russians to compete as neutrals

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Urgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief MOST READ LATEST STORIES Ferrari shows good pace, reliability in 1st week of F1 tests However, with just eight days before the European indoors start in Glasgow, Russia says they won’t have time to get British visas.“They’re all obviously happy to get neutral status and the theoretical chance to compete at the European championships, but for objective reasons our athletes have to turn it down,” head coach Yuri Borzakovsky said in a statement. “They just physically can’t manage to sort out all the organizational issues in such a short time.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesThe federation said this affects six athletes including Sokolova and decathlete Artyom Makarenko who meet the qualifying standards. Another 11 Russians who already had approval will compete led by two-time world high jump champion Maria Lasitskene.The IAAF said it had not been told of any visa issues before deciding the athletes’ cases and that Russian officials told its staff they wanted to send Makarenko to the championships as recently as Tuesday. FILE – In this file photo dated Thursday, June 6, 2013, Russia’s Yelena Sokolova competes in the women’s long jump event at the Golden Gala IAAF athletic meeting, in Rome’s Olympic stadium. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, FILE)MOSCOW, Russia—Russia’s officially neutral track and field team swelled in size as the IAAF approved 21 more athletes on Thursday to compete internationally — but Russia says it’s too late for next week’s European indoor championships.The IAAF ruled Yelena Sokolova, the 2012 Olympic silver medalist in long jump, can return to international competition for the first time since Russia’s team was banned in 2015 over widespread doping. Triple jumper Irina Gumenyuk has her approval extended from last season.ADVERTISEMENT US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusationscenter_img SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte To get neutral status, Russian athletes have had to show they’re clean by providing information about their drug-testing history to an IAAF panel.The approvals are the first granted since the World Anti-Doping Agency started analyzing data from the Moscow laboratory last month. The IAAF said it has yet to receive any of the data.A total of 64 Russians have neutral status for 2019, of which 45 had the same status last year. A large number of cases have yet to be heard ahead of the world championships in Doha, which runs from Sept. 28 through Oct. 6.Seventy-three Russians had the status at some stage last season, according to Russian officials, who said they sent 192 applications for this season.Even with the neutral-status system in place, there have still been doping-related embarrassments for the IAAF and Russia. Of the six Russians who won world championship medals as neutrals in 2017, two have since been stripped of that status.ADVERTISEMENT They are race walk silver medalist Sergei Shirobokov, who traveled to a remote part of Kyrgyzstan to work with a banned coach, and the high jumper Daniil Lysenko, who is charged with failing to make himself available for three drug tests.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss View commentslast_img read more