Indiana Poultry Producers Donate 75 Tons of Food

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Poultry Producers Donate 75 Tons of Food Facebook Twitter By Hoosier Ag Today – Nov 19, 2018 Facebook Twitter Indiana Poultry Producers Donate 75 Tons of Food SHARE SHARE Governor Eric Holcomb and ISPA Executive Vice President Paul BrennanMore than 75 tons, or 150,000 pounds, of poultry products were donated to families in need ahead of the holiday season, announced today by the Indiana State Poultry Association (ISPA). Governor Eric J. Holcomb and Indiana State Department of Agriculture Director Bruce Kettler recognized the generosity of these producers at the association’s 71st annual poultry donation.“Indiana’s poultry producers are remarkable,” Holcomb said. “Year after year, they provide thousands of meals for Hoosiers in need. I commend their goodwill and encourage others to follow their example this holiday season.”For decades, Indiana’s poultry producers have been working to address food insecurity in their communities by providing protein to food banks across the state. Some of the main products that were donated this year include eggs, chicken, duck and turkey.In fact, more than 600,000 eggs were donated by members of the association, according to Paul Brennan, ISPA Executive Vice President.“It was an honor to recognize these producers, who are leaders in the industry and community-oriented,” Kettler said. “They are important to our state’s social and economic well-being, and I applaud their generosity, as well as Paul’s leadership of the association.”The strength of Indiana’s poultry sector was also recognized during the ceremony, as one of the top poultry producing states in the nation. According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, Indiana ranks No. 1 in duck production, No. 2 in egg production and No. 3 in turkeys raised.Annually, the poultry sector contributes more than $9.5 billion to the state’s economy and accounts for more than 11,000 Hoosier jobs.“Indiana’s poultry industry is large and diverse, and it is no accident,” Brennan said. “Geographically we may be the smallest state west of the Appalachian mountains, but we are an agrarian powerhouse with cropland for soybeans and corn. Our family farmers excel at efficiently turning those crops into high quality protein eggs, turkey, duck and chicken.”Products displayed during the annual poultry donation were donated to Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana.Visit www.inpoultry.com for more information about ISPA.Source: Indiana State Department of Agriculture Previous articleUSDA Cancels Trade Aid to SmithfieldNext articleBayer Prepared to Provide Dicamba Training in Indiana Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more

Comedy group explores religious beliefs during lecture

first_imgTwitter + posts TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Jacqueline Lambiase is still fighting for students ReddIt Previous articleHoroscope: September 26, 2018Next articleFootball looks to hit reset button in midst of two-game losing streak Renee Umsted RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin TCU will not raise tuition for the 2021-22 academic year Welcome TCU Class of 2025 ‘Horned Frogs lead the way’: A look at TCU’s ROTC programs In this sketch, three people try to convince a man to join the Holier-Than-Thou Club, the only group that can go to heaven. – Photo by Renee Umsted Renee is a journalism major. She is dedicated to improving her journalism skills to effectively and ethically inform others. Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Linkedin Facebook Facebook Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Renee Umsted Twitter TCU 360 staff win awards at the Fall National College Media Convention ReddIt World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ printIn the last sketch of the show, the comedy team highlight how distracting phones can be during times of worship. – Photo by Renee Umsted The SketchCo comedy team used humor Tuesday night to encourage people to examine the common threads of their religious views rather than focus on differences. A crowd of about 140 people – students, faculty and community members – filled the auditorium in Moudy North to learn how to be respectful when blending humor and religion. The comedians based their six scripted sketches on common actions and religious beliefs.Britt Luby, the coordinator of the Crossroads Lecture on Faith and Public Life, said talking across differences is important for religious people to realize what they have in common with each other.   A recent Pew Research Center analysis created a new typology for religious groups in America, categorizing adults into seven groups based on characteristics such as shared beliefs, how actively they practice their spiritual tradition and how much value they place on their religion. While factors such as political orientation, race and ethnicity were not used to group the participants, the results indicate that some groups have specific demographic profiles and political orientations, showing the connections between religion, politics and race and highlighting the conflict among and within religious groups in America.Censoring what is mentioned in public or trying to simply change jokes to fit current standards of what is appropriate are not permanent solutions to deciding what should be the foundation for humor, said SketchCo writer-actor Ben Fort. If people base their humor on the fact that individuals are inherently valuable, they will not have to change their comedy over time.The first sketch, titled “Pardon Me,” made fun of people who use social media to point out and correct errors in other people’s beliefs and who stubbornly refuse to acknowledge the validity in anyone else’s ideas.In another sketch, a man walked into a belief store to return some of the beliefs he received from his parents. The man ultimately left the store with the idea that one should treat others with love, recognizing that he would also have to love himself. Mark Schatzman, 59, said the belief store sketch was most striking to him because it made him reflect on which of his parents’ beliefs he was still carrying. Five of the sketches were performed live, one was on video. In the clip, a Syrian immigrant to the United States working as a Lyft driver narrated a passenger conversation. The driver reflected on the passenger’s lack of knowledge about the driver’s religion and culture based on racist and Islamophobic comments made by the passenger. In the question and answer session that followed the show, the members of SketchCo talked about how important it is to approach conversations about religious matters with a desire to learn, not with an attitude of aggression. First-year student Jessica Webba said the event showed her that she needed to question why she laughs at jokes because comedy can sometimes be hurtful. last_img read more

Regime continues to close newspapers, impose jail sentences on journalists

first_img Reporters Without Borders condemns the closure of three newspapers in the past few days and the imposition of a jail sentence on another journalist in the government’s continuing crackdown on the media. The Commission for Press Authorisation and Surveillance, the censorship arm of the ministry of culture and Islamic orientation, has suspended the business daily Asia and withdrawn the licences of the weeklies Sepidar and Parastoo, while Badrolsadat Mofidi, the secretary-general of the Association of Iranian Journalists, has been sentenced to six years in prison.Asia’s suspension was announced on 17 August by Mohammed Ali Ramin, deputy minister of culture and Islamic orientation, who said it was for “publishing images contrary to public virtues.” The case has been sent to the justice ministry for judicial investigation. In reality, the newspaper has been closed for criticising the government’s economic policies and the heavy involvement of the Revolutionary Guards in the economy. It is its third suspension since its launch in 2002.Several of Asia’s journalists have been jailed since its creation. When it was suspended in July 2003 at the behest of then Tehran prosecutor general Sayeed Mortazavi for “anti-government publicity” after publishing a photo of Maryam Radjavi of the banned People’s Mujahideen, editor Iraj Jamshidi was arrested and held for several months. The Tehran supreme court sentenced publisher Saghi Baghernia to six months in prison in August 2006 for “anti-government propaganda.” One of Asia’s reporters, Ali-Reza Ahmadi was arrested in July 2003 and was not released until the following January, after paying 1 billion rials (100,000 euros) in bail.The licences of Sepidar and Parastoo were withdrawn on the same grounds – “publishing images contrary to public virtues.” The latest issues of Sepidar, which is owned by the Tehran University militia and supports radical militia members, had included articles criticising President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s controversial vice-president, Esfandiar Rahim Mashai. Sepidar also published a cartoon of a son of former President Hashemi Rafsanjani who was allegedly involved in the payment of bribes by a Norwegian company. These two closures are the result of in-fighting within the regime.More than 20 newspapers have been suspended in Iran since President Ahmadinejad’s reelection in June 2009. Ramin, the deputy minister of culture and Islamic orientation, is keeping his promise to do everything possible to “liquidate” the press. The country has been purged of its journalists and newspapers on the grounds of preserving “public morality.”Reporters Without Borders is dismayed to learn that a Tehran revolutionary court sentenced Badrolsadat Mofidi to six years in prison followed by a five-year ban on working as a journalist. Arrested on 28 December 2009, she was held in Section 209 of Tehran’s Evin prison until released on 7 June after paying 100 million tomans (75,000 euros) in bail.The heavy jail sentence imposed on Mofidi and the closure of the Association of Iranian Journalists for the past year are major blows for press freedom and journalists in Iran.President Ahmadinejad and Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the Islamic Republic’s Supreme Leader, are on the Reporters Without Borders list of Predators of Press Freedom. RSF_en Receive email alerts News News Follow the news on Iran Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists News IranMiddle East – North Africa Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 to go furthercenter_img August 20, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Regime continues to close newspapers, impose jail sentences on journalists June 9, 2021 Find out more News Organisation March 18, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information IranMiddle East – North Africa After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists February 25, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Press freedom activist Liu Xiaobo manhandled by Beijing police

first_imgNews June 4, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Press freedom activist Liu Xiaobo manhandled by Beijing police RSF_en Organisation ChinaAsia – Pacific Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes June 2, 2021 Find out more China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison ChinaAsia – Pacific April 27, 2021 Find out more Receive email alertscenter_img News to go further News Reporters Without Borders strongly condemns the way police officers manhandled, detained and threatened writer and press freedom activist Liu Xiaobo this evening as he was leaving his Beijing home with his wife, Liu Xia, to go and have dinner at someone else’s home. The police grabbed him by the head, neck and arm, led him away and held him for several hours. They finally escorted him back to his home and told him he could not go out.The press freedom organisation stresses its support for Liu, who in 2004 was awarded the Reporters Without Borders – Fondation de France prize for defending freedom.“The behaviour of these police officers on the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre shows that, 19 years later, the authorities continue to crack down on those who campaign peacefully for the rehabilitation of the victims of the events of 4 June 1989,” Reporters Without Borders said.Liu is a leading human rights figure. His writings include an essay condemning the frequent use of subversion charges – which are brought against many cyber-dissidents – as a “legal aberration.”Liu spent two years in prison after publicly defending the June 1989 pro-democracy movement. He was sentenced to another three years of reeducation through work in 1996 for questioning the Communist Party’s monopoly of party political activity. Help by sharing this information News China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures Follow the news on China March 12, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Why Reverse Mortgages Keep Moving Forward

first_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago  Print This Post March 18, 2019 3,933 Views For many older homeowners, reverse mortgages are an easy way to tap into their home’s equity. Despite many misconceptions about reverse mortgages, they may not even be as risky as many believe, according to experts, as more and more homeowners take advantage of the product.An article from Bloomberg explores the recent movement to reverse mortgages. Despite the risk, such as taxes, insurance, maintenance, and utilities as well as a risk of foreclosure, reverse mortgages are still a viable equity alternative to selling and moving. Tightening rules after 2008, including requiring homeowners to show they can afford tax and insurance payments, has reduced the risks involved with reverse mortgages since then. However, some still note the risks involved“The profits are significant, the oversight is minimal, and greed could work to the disadvantage of seniors who should be protected by government programs and not targeted as prey,” said Dave Stevens, CEO of the Mortgage Bankers Association on Bloomberg.DS News reported earlier that, according to LendingTree and data from the Federal Housing Authority’s Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) program, HECMs originated in the 100 studied cities at an average rate of 7.1 loans per 1,000 homeowners over the age of 60 between 2012 and 2017. The top city, Virginia Beach, boasted a rate of 13.8 loans per 1,000 homeowners over the age of 60.Government-back loans as a whole have seen a resurgence. Kroll Bond Ratings Agency reported 63 percent increase in residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) issued in 2018 over 2017. The report indicated that if the U.S. GDP was to grow at the steady pace it has this year, until July 2019, the year could see “another robust issuance year in 2019.” However, factors such as higher interest rates, home price moderation, and widening spreads that have been experienced by the market in the last few weeks are likely headwinds that might pull down the performance of RMBS next year, the report revealed.”Given the potential downside risks, we aren’t forecasting issuance growth in 2019, but believe issuance will be comparable to 2018 levels,” KBRA stated in the outlook. Bloomberg HECM Kroll Bond Rating LendingTree Reverse Mortgages RMBS 2019-03-18 Seth Welborn Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tagged with: Bloomberg HECM Kroll Bond Rating LendingTree Reverse Mortgages RMBS About Author: Seth Welborn The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Why Reverse Mortgages Keep Moving Forwardcenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Investment, Market Studies, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share Save Home / Daily Dose / Why Reverse Mortgages Keep Moving Forward Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Court Approves $13.8M Wells Fargo Settlement Next: Fair Warning: State Supreme Court Rules on Foreclosure Notices Subscribelast_img read more

Basal terraces on melting ice shelves

first_imgOcean waters melt the margins of Antarctic and Greenland glaciers, and individual glaciers’ responses and the integrity of their ice shelves are expected to depend on the spatial distribution of melt. The bases of the ice shelves associated with Pine Island Glacier (West Antarctica) and Petermann Glacier (Greenland) have similar geometries, including kilometer-wide, hundreds-of-meter high channels oriented along and across the direction of ice flow. The channels are enhanced by, and constrain, oceanic melt. New meter-scale observations of basal topography reveal peculiar glaciated landscapes. Channel flanks are not smooth, but are instead stepped, with hundreds-of-meters-wide flat terraces separated by 5–50 m high walls. Melting is shown to be modulated by the geometry: constant across each terrace, changing from one terrace to the next, and greatly enhanced on the ~45° inclined walls. Melting is therefore fundamentally heterogeneous and likely associated with stratification in the ice-ocean boundary layer, challenging current models of ice shelf-ocean interactions.last_img read more

READERS FORUM OCTOBER 4, 2016

first_imgWHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?Todays READERS POLL question is: Are you getting sick and tired of our elected and appointed City officials playing political games with our hard earn tax dollars?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] County Observer has been serving our community for 15 years.Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistribute.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img

Posthumous Music Video Of Leonard Cohen Is Released [Watch]

first_imgOf the many greats to pass away in 2016 was singer/songwriter Leonard Cohen. He passed away just one month after his final release You Want It Darker. Son Adam Cohen and creative collaborator Sammy Slabbinck composed a lyric video for the track “Traveling Light” that sees Leonard Cohen growing older and learning to understand it. The footage is all real, and includes previously unseen clips and home videos of Cohen.The album was Cohen’s way of coping with his ongoing sickness, and became a therapeutic process for him, according to Rolling Stone. Watch the newly released video below:last_img

A historic year for Harvard admissions

first_imgFor the first time in Harvard’s history, more than 30,000 students applied to the College, leading to an admission rate of 6.9 percent for the Class of 2014. Letters of admission (and e-mail notifications) were sent on April 1 to 2,110 of the 30,489 applicants. More than 60 percent of the admitted students will receive need-based scholarships averaging $40,000, benefiting from a record $158 million in financial aid. Families with students on scholarship are expected to contribute an average of $11,500 annually toward the cost of a Harvard education.A number of factors contributed to such unprecedented results. “In these uncertain economic times, prospective students and their families have been particularly drawn to the excellence of Harvard’s faculty and students, and its remarkable academic programs,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid. “Harvard’s new School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has underscored Harvard’s commitment to expanding opportunities in engineering and all the sciences. The University is also highly focused on fostering closer relationships between the College and Harvard’s rich array of graduate and professional Schools, as well as its numerous research and regional centers. These University resources, many of which focus on national and international public policy issues, greatly expand and enrich the experience for Harvard College students,” he said.Applications to Harvard have doubled since 1994, and about half the increase has come since the University implemented a series of financial aid initiatives over the past five years to ensure that a Harvard education remains accessible and affordable for the best students from all economic backgrounds. “Financial aid has never been more important to students aspiring to higher education,” said Fitzsimmons. “The unwavering commitment of President Drew Faust, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael Smith, and Dean of the College Evelynn Hammonds to keeping Harvard’s doors open to all talented students sends a powerful message that reaches far beyond our campus,” he said. Seventy percent of undergraduates receive some form of financial aid.In 2004, Harvard introduced the first in a series of financial aid initiatives that have greatly expanded its appeal to students from a wide range of backgrounds. For the first time, more than 25 percent of admitted students are eligible for this program that asks for no parental contribution from those with annual incomes under $60,000, and reduces contributions from families with incomes of $60,000 to $80,000. “The search for talented students from modest economic backgrounds is more intense than ever before — a public policy result that is of significant benefit to our nation,” said  Fitzsimmons. “We hope the current economic environment, which is particularly challenging for families of modest means and for the school districts in which many of them live, will not discourage students from reaching their full potential and slow the progress evidenced in the past few years.”Many additional students are eligible for the expanded aid, announced in December 2007, for middle- and upper-middle income families. Families with incomes up to $180,000 a year and typical assets are now asked to contribute from zero to 10 percent of their income; home equity is removed from financial aid calculations; and loans have been eliminated for all students.By standard measures of academic talent, including test scores and academic performance, this year’s applicant pool reflects an unprecedented level of excellence. For example, more than 3,000 applicants scored a perfect 800 on the SAT Critical Reading Test; 4,100 scored 800 on the SAT Math Test; and nearly 3,600 were ranked first in their high school classes.More than half of the applicant pool and more than half (52.4 percent) of those admitted are men. Last year, both the pool and the admitted group were also comprised of more males, but the matriculating class had slightly more women, because a higher percentage of them accepted their offer of admission.Minority representation remained strong in this year’s admitted group, and similar to last year’s numbers, although it is difficult to make precise comparisons to previous years because of changes in federal requirements concerning the collection and reporting of race and ethnicity information. A total of 18.2 percent of the admitted students indicated they were Asian-American (17.5 percent last year), 11.3 percent African-American (10.4 percent last year), 10.3 percent Latino (10.6 percent last year), 2.7 percent Native American (1.1 percent last year) and 0.4 percent Native Hawaiian (0.2 percent last year).Geographic representation remained similar to last year’s figures. Nearly 24 percent of the admitted students are from the mid-Atlantic states, 21 percent from the Western and Mountain states, 18 percent from the South, 16 percent from New England, 11 percent from the Midwest, and 10 percent from the U.S. territories and abroad.Foreign citizens make up 9 percent of the admitted students. In addition, a significant number of other entering students will bring an international perspective, including 135 U.S. dual citizens, 92 U.S. permanent residents, and many Americans who have lived abroad. Together, foreign citizens, U.S. duals, and U.S. permanent residents constitute nearly 20 percent of the class. There are 79 countries represented in the Class of 2014. “Students with international living experiences add immensely to the education of their college classmates,” said Robin M. Worth, director of international admissions.[chart data=”24.9,12.2,21.3,24.3,8.3,6.8,2,0.2″ labels=”Humanities|Engineering|Social Sciences|Biological Sciences|Physical Sciences|Mathematics|Computer Sciences|Undecided” size=”500×200″ colors=”a6cee3,1f78b4,b2df8a,33a02c,fb9a99,e31a1c,fdbf6f,ff7f00″ title =”2010 Concentrations” type=”pie”] Students’ academic interests shifted somewhat this year. Nearly one-quarter (24.9 percent) of the admitted students intend to concentrate in the humanities, compared with  22.7 percent last year. Engineering attracted 12.2 percent, (10.2 percent last year), while students expressing an interest in the social sciences constituted 21.3 percent, (24.6 percent last year). Other choices remained similar to those made last year, with 24.3 percent planning a biological sciences concentration, 8.3 percent physical sciences, 6.8 percent mathematics, 2 percent computer science, and 0.2 percent undecided.The Class of 2014 will bring extraordinary extracurricular talents to Harvard across a wide range of endeavors. Major activities cited by students as extracurricular interests are music and other expressive and performing arts (46 percent), debate and political activities, including student government (34 percent), writing and journalism (21 percent), and social service (21 percent). In addition, 58 percent of the class expects to participate in recreational, intramural, or intercollegiate athletics.“The help of alumni/ae interviewers is more important than ever as the Admissions Committee chooses a small number of students from an ever-increasing applicant pool,” said Marlyn E. McGrath, director of admissions. “Personal qualities and character remain central to each and every admissions decision. Our 10,000 alumni/ae volunteers around the world make a huge difference to us in many other ways as well — attending college nights, visiting schools, and calling newly admitted students and hosting gatherings for them in April. We can never thank them enough for their loyalty and devotion to Harvard,” she said. Added James Wigdahl, liaison to the Alumni/ae Schools and Scholarship Committees, “We are particularly grateful to our alumni/ae volunteers for their patience and hard work in making our new electronic system function so well, a change that enabled interviews to be submitted in a much more timely and effective manner, even as the number of applications has risen.”Recruitment is the foundation of Harvard’s strength. Nearly 70 percent of all admitted students and 90 percent of minority students appeared on the original College Board Search List that helped launch Harvard’s outreach program for the Class of 2014. Staff will visit 60 cities this spring, targeting the high school juniors who may eventually join the Class of 2015. Joint travel trips will be conducted with Duke, Georgetown, Penn, and Stanford universities. “Joint travel is the fundamental element of our recruitment. Last spring and fall, Harvard admissions officers visited all 50 states, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico, where we saw 40,000 high school students and parents. We also met with more than 3,000 high school guidance counselors,” said Angela Flygh, director of the Joint Travel Program. In addition, Harvard students visited some of these areas and others to speak at high schools.Eliminating Early Action two years ago allowed more time in the fall for staff to communicate with students who might not have otherwise thought about applying to Harvard. Joint outreach events with Princeton University and the University of Virginia (both of which also eliminated early admission) met with an overwhelming reception in November, previously a time when all three institutions were off the road conducting early-admission selection meetings. Harvard once again will visit nearly 20 cities with this group.“Undergraduate recruitment has a long and distinguished history at Harvard,” said Roger Banks, director of undergraduate recruitment. “Members of the Undergraduate Minority Recruitment Program [UMRP] and the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative [HFAI] played a crucial role in attracting this year’s record pool of admitted students.” Members of both organizations telephoned and sent e-mail messages and letters to prospective applicants. They also conducted recruitment trips to various parts of the country and met with middle school and high school student groups who visited campus.“HFAI is one of Harvard’s highest priorities, and once again we were able to attract outstanding students from families with annual incomes under $60,000 and $80,000,” said Patrick Griffin, director of HFAI. Precious Eboigbe, HFAI assistant director, noted, “Undergraduates worked closely with staff and alumni/ae, forming a partnership that enabled us to reach out to talented students from modest economic backgrounds.” Monica Del Toro-Brown, the other assistant director, added, “HFAI opens up new worlds that many students never dreamed were possible.”Fitzsimmons and McGrath again praised the efforts of the Undergraduate Admissions Council (UAC) and the undergraduate tour guides and greeters who work throughout the year with visitors to Cambridge — leading tours, hosting prospective applicants overnight, and visiting high schools. David L. Evans, director of the UAC, noted that “prospective students are extremely interested in meeting current undergraduates to learn firsthand about the Harvard experience.” Added Elise Eggart, UAC associate director, “UAC members extend a warm welcome to students interested in Harvard. Their hospitality and thoughtfulness are greatly appreciated, both by prospective students and their families.”Elizabeth Pabst, director of the Undergraduate Tour Program, said, “Our tour guides and greeters welcome students to campus throughout the year. They love to share personal anecdotes about life at Harvard, both inside and outside the classroom. They often are the first Harvard students a prospective applicant meets, and they introduce college life with grace, humor, and enthusiasm.” Added Devery Doran, assistant director of the program, “Rain or shine, in small groups or large, you’ll find them walking backward through Harvard Yard, leading groups of prospective students and their families from around the world.”McGrath emphasized the important role of the teaching faculty in the admissions process. Faculty members speak with many prospective students in person or on the phone and answer their letters and e-mail inquiries. “Faculty accessibility is a clear demonstration of Harvard’s commitment to undergraduate education. In addition, faculty members read hundreds of applications, evaluate academic research of all kinds, and assess portfolios across a range of academic disciplines,” she said.Members of the teaching faculty serving on the Admissions Committee are: Peter J. Burgard, John E. Dowling, Edward L. Glaeser, Benedict H. Gross, Guido Guidotti, Evelynn M. Hammonds, Joseph D. Harris, J. Woodland Hastings, Eric N. Jacobsen, Thomas Jehn, Harry R. Lewis, Richard M. Losick, David R. McCann, Michael D. Mitzenmacher, Cherry Murray, Richard J. O’Connell, Orlando Patterson, Frans Spaepen, Christopher Stubbs, Steven C. Wofsy, Robert M. Woollacott, and Amir Yacoby.Personal contact with admitted students will be important over the next few weeks. Members of the Undergraduate Admissions Council, the Undergraduate Minority Recruitment Program, the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative, the admissions and financial aid staff, and the teaching faculty will telephone and meet with admitted students.For the seventh year, the Admissions Office hosted message boards for students throughout the year. In addition, chat sessions in April will provide an opportunity for admitted students to speak with Harvard undergraduates and one another. Danielle Early, director of Internet communications, said, “The chat sessions and message boards extend our outreach and recruitment to students across the world.” Prospective Harvard students can post questions to Harvard undergraduates and admissions representatives on the message board. “The boards provide yet another way for students to meet and make connections with future classmates,” said Early.To give admitted students the opportunity to experience Harvard life and meet their future professors and classmates, a Visiting Program for admitted students is scheduled for April 24-26. In addition to visiting classes, students will attend faculty panel discussions, concerts, receptions, department open houses, symposia, and dozens of events organized by extracurricular organizations. More than 1,300 admitted students will visit during April, and 1,100 will be here during the Visiting Program. “We know that contact with current undergraduates and faculty is critically important to students as they evaluate their college options. Students often cite the Visiting Program as pivotal in their decision to choose Harvard,” said Visiting Program Director Valerie Beilenson.Sarah C. Donahue, director of financial aid, and her colleagues will be available to talk with admitted students and their families on weekdays during April from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EDT. “Especially in these challenging economic times, we look forward to talking with students and parents who have concerns or questions about how to finance a Harvard education, including families who may not have applied for financial aid but who are interested in the wide range of available payment options. Our program offers assistance to all students and families, ranging from full financial aid to a number of financing alternatives: a monthly payment plan, the opportunity to prepay tuition at current rates, and a variety of parent loan programs that extend payments up to 15 years,” she said.“Students and their families should know that there are other forms of financial assistance, such as the Faculty Aide Program, the Harvard College Research Program, and the Dean’s Summer Research Program, which enable students to create paid partnerships with faculty members on academic projects of mutual interest,” said Meg Brooks Swift, director of student employment and the Harvard College Research Program.Admitted students have until May 1 to accept their offers of admission.last_img read more

Sales, service, or success?

first_img“We need to establish a sales culture…We don’t sell, we educate…Our outstanding service will lead to sales.” All are common phrases expressed through credit unions describing the retail delivery of products and services. All are correct, in their own manner. All can be questioned, in their own perspective, too. As credit unions connect the gap between service and sales, one aspect remains constant and undeniable: when the member succeeds, the credit union succeeds.Perhaps a “Success Culture” provides the necessary balance.Focusing on success for the member, through sales and service, introduces a trading of value. For the most part, the credit union trades a set of well-priced products and, over time, the member exchanges value through increases in product use and purchases.Success can certainly come through sales – new loans, additional deposits, insurance purchases, etc. But, too much focus on sales can create a “pushy” experience where members hear a pitch at the smallest hint of opportunity.Success can undeniably happen through service – fast transactions, technological options, error resolution, etc. But, too much focus on service can make it easy to overlook growth prospects in the quest for an experience that doesn’t feel overly ambitious to the member.How does a success culture balance the short-term need to serve with the long-term need to grow revenue? It begins with an outlook that ensures members are getting the most from their current set of products; continues with information introduced to illustrate how members can experience more success with the credit union; and, concludes with an attitude of action that guarantees all opportunities for success are fulfilled (i.e., moving the look-to-book ratio forward).Front line leaders in a success culture need to see every member interaction as an opportunity to extend the long-term nature of a business relationship. This occurs with a twofold commitment: first, to serving the immediate need at hand; and second, to continuously showing members the tangible value they are receiving and how they might receive more. It’s as simple as remembering that the credit union does not succeed until the member succeeds. So, focus on member success. And maintain that each member understands that success, in the near- and long-term, is the goal.Measuring a success culture is as balanced as its execution. Growth and performance measures might include new members, member retention, new loans, and cross-sales. Service measures such as Net Promoter Score, Member Effort Score, and post-transaction feedback provide insights into relationships where revenues will be achieved gradually over time. Incentives and rewards should be just as balanced, with perhaps 25 percent dependent upon revenue initiatives and 75 percent supported by service-focused measures.As front-line leaders earn trust, members will invite them to participate in more in-depth conversations. This gives front line leaders insights for recommending a path to value, regardless of whether that course includes added revenue right away. Looking out for the member is the focus. This kind of attention allows front line leaders to explain more about value to their members, creating a positive impression that results in the member driving more business to the credit union. The outcome is a win for the credit union, with success seen on the balance sheet and income statement.As long as the member succeeds first. 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jeff Rendel Jeff Rendel, Certified Speaking Professional, and President of Rising Above Enterprises works with credit unions that want elite results in sales, service, and strategy. Each year, he addresses and facilitates … Web: www.risingaboveenterprises.com Detailslast_img read more